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                    [post_content] => 

Congratulations on adding a new cat to your family!

You probably have a lot of questions.

Kitten Kit for new Cat OwnersBulger's Kitten Kit is a pack we hand out to new cat owners. It answers many questions about vaccinations, training, feeding and nurturing your kitten. We hope it helps, but if you have more questions, please don't hesitate to call or make an appointment. Simply click the icon above and enjoy. You should be able to easily save clippings, add bookmarks, print, and share the pack with your friends. Here's to many happy, healthy years with your new (and current) cat(s)! [post_title] => Me and My New Kitten [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => me-and-my-new-kitten [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-07-09 14:30:40 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-07-09 18:30:40 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?post_type=faq&p=4513 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => faq [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 4510 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2013-07-09 11:47:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-07-09 15:47:25 [post_content] =>

Congratulations on adding a new dog to your family!

You probably have a lot of questions.

Click the link to open the puppy packBulger's Puppy Pack is a kit we hand out to new dog owners. It answers many questions about vaccinations, training, feeding and nurturing your new dog. We hope it helps, but if you have more questions, please don't hesitate to call or make an appointment. Simply click the icon above and enjoy. You should be able to easily save clippings, add bookmarks, print, and share the pack with your friends. Here's to many happy, healthy years with your new (and current) dog(s)! [post_title] => Me and My New Puppy [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => me-and-my-new-puppy [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-07-09 11:53:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-07-09 15:53:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?post_type=faq&p=4510 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => faq [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 3382 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2012-11-14 15:41:48 [post_date_gmt] => 2012-11-14 20:41:48 [post_content] =>

Frequently asked questions about Chemotherapy:

What is Chemotherapy?

The use of a drug or chemical to treat any illness is referred to as "chemotherapy", but this term commonly refers to the use of drugs in the systemic treatment of cancer. The ultimate goal of chemotherapy would be to cure the patient of cancer.  In most instances (and at this point in time in veterinary medicine), this is not a realistic goal.  Until we can cure cancer, our goals are to: The term "remission"  refers to the time interval during which there are no outward signs that the patient has cancer.  Unfortunately, it is not possible to predict which animals will achieve full remission, nor how long it will take and how long it will last if remission is achieved. Every patient and pet-owner relationship is different and is managed on an individual basis. In appropriate situations, chemotherapy can be used to benefit pets with cancer.  Most pets tolerate chemotherapy well, do not realize that they are ill, and appear to enjoy their extended life.  However, each owner must believe that they are doing the right thing for their pet, in their situation.  If it were ever obvious that therapy was not working, or that the pet was experiencing pain or discomfort, we would work with you to discuss any changes in the treatment plan, and tailor a new approach, as needed.  

How Does Chemotherapy Work?

Cancer cells generally multiply very rapidly.  Most chemotherapy drugs work by damaging rapidly growing cells (including both cancer cells and some normal cells in the body).  Different drugs interfere with different steps in the process of cell growth and division.  This decreases the ability of these rapidly growing cells to divide, and kills them. Some newer chemotherapy drugs (called targeted therapies) have been designed to attack more specific targets that may be found on certain cancer cells.  In many cases, a combination of drugs is the most effective way to kill the cancer cells. Your pet's treatment dose and schedule will depend on the type of cancer and the chemotherapy method.

How is Chemotherapy Given?

The oncologist will examine your pet and consult in detail with you and your regular veterinarian. Together a decision will be made about whether to pursue chemotherapy (based on your pet's type of cancer and prognosis) and which protocol would best be applied. If chemotherapy is given to your pet, our veterinary oncologist will tailor the course of therapy carefully.  Treatment for each patient is individually managed, although specific chemotherapy protocols consisting of several different drugs are followed for different types of cancer. The majority of chemotherapy drugs are given by intravenous injection, but some are given by mouth. Prior to each treatment a blood sample will be drawn. The white blood cell count, red blood cell count, and platelet count will be checked to ensure that it is safe to proceed with treatment; in some cases, your pet may not receive treatment due to a low white or red blood cell count. The route chosen depends on the type of cancer being treated and how well the therapy is tolerated by the patient. Treatment may be prescribed on a daily, weekly or monthly basis.  The specific length of your pet's individual course of treatment will be discussed in detail with you.  

Will My Pet Experience Side Effects?

Maybe. Chemotherapy is a word that creates an instant emotional response in everyone.  Visions of debilitating nausea, vomiting, coupled with loss of hair and lack of energy are associated with the term. However, the reality of chemotherapy for animals is much different than that of human cancer patients. For animals receiving chemotherapy, quality of life for the patient is the primary concern for us and for each pet's owner.  Doses of drugs and treatment schedules are designed to minimize discomfort to the patient, while providing the most effective defense against the disease.  As a result, most people are pleasantly surprised at how well their pets feel while undergoing chemotherapy. Ideally, the animal receiving chemotherapy does not even realize that he or she is ill, and most of our patients do not have side effects with treatment.  The drugs used in chemotherapy, however, are extremely potent and side effects can occur in about 20-30% of animals who receive chemotherapy treatment.  The potential for side effects must be balanced against the benefits of the chemotherapy and the side effects of the cancer if left untreated.  Choosing chemotherapy for your pet is an individual decision.  

What Are the Most Common Side Effects?

The most common side effect reported by owners is that their pet seems to be “off” for a day or two.  This might mean that he or she has slightly less energy or seems less excited about eating, than usual. Less commonly, he or she may skip a meal or two, have one episode of vomiting or diarrhea, or seem unusually lethargic. Unfortunately, there is no way to predict whether your pet will develop serious reactions.  The animal receiving chemotherapy needs to be watched closely and will need to be taken to his or her veterinarian at the first sign of illness.  Although serious side effects can occur with any chemotherapy, there is less than a 5% chance that a patient will be hospitalized with side effects, and less than a 1% chance of fatality caused by overwhelming infections.  

What Other Side-Effects May Occur?

Practically all anti cancer drugs have side effects.  These side effects arise because the normal cells in the body are also exposed to the anti cancer drug.  The most sensitive normal cells are found in the blood, gastrointestinal tract, skin, and reproductive system.  Consequently, potential side effects include infections, bleeding, decreased appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, thin hair coat or skin color changes, and sterility. Rare side effects associated with specific drugs include bladder discomfort, kidney damage and heart failure.  Although serious adverse effects can occur with any chemotherapy, there is less than a 5% chance that a patient will be hospitalized with side effects and less than a 1% chance of fatality caused by overwhelming infections.  However, in general the potential benefit of treatment with anti cancer drugs outweighs the possible side effects.  Below are listed some of the potential side effects of many chemotherapeutic agents in more detail:  

Chemotherapy Precautions

If your pet is receiving chemotherapy, the following precautions should be followed.  In some cases these precautions are not necessary, but it’s best to establish a safe routine.  When in doubt, it is always better to be overly cautious! Generally, it is safe to have unlimited contact with your pet during chemotherapy.

What Happens After Treatment is Over?

It is important for your veterinary oncologist, or your regular veterinarian to examine your pet periodically after chemotherapy is over, usually at 1 –2 month intervals.  This will allow potential problems, such as recurrence of the cancer, to be detected before they become too advanced.  Treatment options will be more numerous, and have a greater potential for success, when problems are identified early. Finally, it is important for owners of pets who have had chemotherapy to realize that the cancers we treat are rarely cured. Almost all of our patients ultimately have recurrence of their cancers. However, it is vital to understand that most pets receiving chemotherapy have an excellent quality of life both during and after treatment.  It is often possible to provide many additional months, or sometimes even years, of happy life with chemotherapy.  The  majority of owners tell us that they have no regrets about their decision to pursue chemotherapy for their pet. [post_title] => Chemotherapy [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => chemotherapy [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2012-11-14 16:03:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2012-11-14 21:03:12 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?post_type=faq&p=3382 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => faq [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 3210 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2012-09-27 11:33:18 [post_date_gmt] => 2012-09-27 15:33:18 [post_content] =>

Considering Cataract Surgery, but you still have questions?

The American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists (ACVO) have produced a short video exploring  the causes, detection, effects and treatment of cataract in dogs and cats. For more information visit the ACVO's website.  

Cataracts: Before, During & After:

Baby was a sweet little two-year old Pitbull with cataracts in both eyes. MSPCA-Nevins Farm in Methuen knew it would be hard to rehome her despite her loving personality. Dr. Marrion performed the surgery on Baby with the goal of giving Baby the chance at a full and happy life! [caption id="attachment_3214" align="aligncenter" width="450" caption="Before: Both of Baby's eyes are cloudy with cataracts. During cataract surgery, Dr. Marrion replaces the lenses in Baby's eyes. After: 1 hour after the first picture was taken, Baby is waking up, and can once again see through her pretty brown eyes."][/caption] [post_title] => Cataract Surgery Video [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => cataract-surgery-video [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2012-09-27 12:51:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2012-09-27 16:51:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?post_type=faq&p=3210 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => faq [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 3209 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2012-09-27 11:29:29 [post_date_gmt] => 2012-09-27 15:29:29 [post_content] => Here is a short video created by the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmology (ACVO) that addresses many questions about what a veterinary ophthalmologist does and can do. [post_title] => What is Veterinary Ophthalmology? [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => what-is-veterinary-ophthalmology [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2012-09-27 11:29:29 [post_modified_gmt] => 2012-09-27 15:29:29 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?post_type=faq&p=3209 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => faq [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2630 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2012-04-06 14:51:18 [post_date_gmt] => 2012-04-06 18:51:18 [post_content] => Are you considering pet insurance to help defray the costs of caring for your pet? If so, please consider the following site:  Pet Insurance Reviews is a helpful resource for researching the best insurance solution for your family's needs. Consumer Guide to Pet Insurance [post_title] => Consumer Guide to Pet Insurance [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => consumer-guide-to-pet-insurance [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2012-04-06 15:00:06 [post_modified_gmt] => 2012-04-06 19:00:06 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?post_type=faq&p=2630 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => faq [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1508 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2011-03-16 10:54:47 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-03-16 14:54:47 [post_content] => skunk odor remover recipeDon't panic ... and don't let them run loose in the house either (if you can help it), they'll rub up against every bit of furniture you own (personal experience). Here's the recipe:
Ingredients:
1Qt. 3% Hydrogen Peroxide 1/4 cup Baking Soda 2 tsp Dawn Liquid Dish Soap.
Steps:
  1. Do not spray your dog or cat with water yet.
  2. Mix the above ingredients together. It will fizz.
  3. Soak your dog or cat's fur with the mix and let it soak in for about 20 minutes. Keep the mix out of your pet's eyes. Use a sponge to clean his or her head and around their eyes.
  4. Knead the solution into the fur, be sure to get every part of your pet with the mixture.
  5. After about 20 minutes rinse thoroughly with water.
Notes:
  1. Avoid contact with your pet's eyes. If your pet's eyes are red and swollen, contact your vet.
  2. Don't premix the recipe. Keep the ingredients separate until you need them.
  3. Double or triple the recipe for larger dogs. This amount should be enough for a small - medium sized dog or cat.
[post_title] => Skunk Odor Remover Recipe [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => skunk-recipe [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-11 14:37:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-11 18:37:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?post_type=faq&p=1508 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => faq [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 913 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2011-01-04 16:01:11 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-01-04 21:01:11 [post_content] => In order to obtain the title of board certified specialist and receive board certification, individuals must complete all of the following steps in the chosen field of specialty study. A veterinarian is an individual with DVM or VMD after their name, who has completed the following educational requirements: A board certified specialist is an individual with a DVM/VMD and the letters DACV… plus the initials of the area of their study, following their name. To receive board certification they must complete all of the following educational requirements: [post_title] => Board Certified Specialist [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => board-certified-specialist [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2011-02-01 15:11:07 [post_modified_gmt] => 2011-02-01 20:11:07 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?post_type=faq&p=913 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => faq [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 806 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2010-12-16 15:17:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-12-16 20:17:09 [post_content] =>

Ear Cleaning

Medication Application

*Note: Allergic reactions to ear medication can occur. Signs of an allergic reaction include excessive redness, blisters, or sores around the ear canal opening, inner ear flap, or base of the ear. If any of these signs are noted or if your pet seems overly irritated or in pain when applying medication, please discontinue all ear medication and contact us immediately. [post_title] => Ear Cleaning and Medicating [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ear-cleaning-and-medicating [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2010-12-16 15:17:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2010-12-16 20:17:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?post_type=faq&p=806 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => faq [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 804 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2010-12-16 15:13:06 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-12-16 20:13:06 [post_content] =>

Why do I need to shampoo my dog?

If my shampoo is good enough for me, why isn’t it good for my pet?

What are my choices of topical therapy?

Instructions for Shampoo Therapy

Notes

Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have further questions or concerns about your pet. [post_title] => Shampoo Therapy for Your Itchy Dog [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => shampoo-therapy [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-07-09 10:42:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-07-09 14:42:04 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?post_type=faq&p=804 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => faq [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 10 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 4513 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2013-07-09 14:21:44 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-07-09 18:21:44 [post_content] =>

Congratulations on adding a new cat to your family!

You probably have a lot of questions.

Kitten Kit for new Cat OwnersBulger's Kitten Kit is a pack we hand out to new cat owners. It answers many questions about vaccinations, training, feeding and nurturing your kitten. We hope it helps, but if you have more questions, please don't hesitate to call or make an appointment. Simply click the icon above and enjoy. You should be able to easily save clippings, add bookmarks, print, and share the pack with your friends. Here's to many happy, healthy years with your new (and current) cat(s)! [post_title] => Me and My New Kitten [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => me-and-my-new-kitten [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-07-09 14:30:40 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-07-09 18:30:40 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?post_type=faq&p=4513 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => faq [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 10 [max_num_pages] => 1 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => 1 [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_404] => [is_comments_popup] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash] => 5a3338d834574d411cc0a5431ff6222d [query_vars_changed] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => )