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The 6th Annual ACVO®/Merial® National Service Dog Eye Exam Event brings together veterinary ophthalmologists and thousands of service animals for free eye exams.

 Registration runs from April 1st-30th, for the May 2013 event

The American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists (ACVO) is launching the 6th annual ACVO/Merial National Service Dog Eye Exam Event in the month of May, to screen service animals who dedicate their lives to serving the public. More than 250 board certified veterinary ophthalmologists throughout the U.S., as well as Canada and Puerto Rico, will be donating their time and resources to provide free, sight-saving eye exams to thousands of eligible service animals. Registration runs from April 1st-30th at www.ACVOEyeExam.org

A sampling of groups served since the ACVO/Merial National Service Dog Eye Exam Event launched in 2008 include: Transportation Security Agency (TSA), military working dogs, Puppies Behind Bars, an organization providing psychiatric service dogs to soldiers coming home from Iraq and Afghanistan, local fire, rescue, and police agencies, and also individual service dog owners and handlers who rely on these amazing animals daily.

WHAT VETERINARY OPHTHALMOLOGISTS LOOK FOR DURING THE EXAM: Dr. Nick Cassotis, DVM, DACVO performs a complete ocular exam utilizing specialty equipment to look for problems including: redness, squinting, corneal disease and retinal disease, early cataracts and other serious abnormalities. Early detection and treatment are vital to these working animals. The complimentary eye exam is of a screening nature. Should more services be needed or desired, you may discuss your options with the specialist. It is expected that the majority of animals will be healthy and will not be in need of additional services. But should such a need arise, we will discuss the condition, present options and best treat your animal. DOES YOUR SERVICE DOG QUALIFY? To qualify, animals must be “active working animals” that were certified by a formal training program or organization or are currently enrolled in a formal training program. The certifying organization could be national, regional or local in nature. Essentially the animals need to have some sort of certification and/or training paperwork to qualify for this particular program. Other serviceanimals are welcome to participate (i.e. horses, cats, etc.), as long as they meet the stated qualifications.  More information on qualifications can be found at www.acvoeyeexam.org. THE FOLLOWING STEPS MUST BE COMPLETED TO PARTICIPATE: Step 1: In order to receive the free eye examination you must FIRST register online for this event at www.acvoeyeexam.org  A confirmation and registration number will be sent to your e-mail address after registration. You will need to provide the registration number when scheduling your appointment with us.  If you do not register, you cannot participate in the event.  Step 2: Once you have registered, the web site will push you through to a page that will allow you to search by state to locate a clinic near you. (Clinics may not be available in every state.) Step 3: After locating Port City Veterinary Referral Hospital, call our office at (603)433-0056 and identify yourself as participating in the ACVO Service Dog event to make an appointment. You must provide the registration number you attained. The dates and times for an appointment vary throughout the month of May. We suggest you register early in April to ensure a better chance of securing an appointment. Those who wait to register may find it difficult to find open time slots of your choosing. Step 4: Visit the ophthalmologist at the appointed time. Please call ahead if you will be late or have to cancel your appointment.  During the examination an eye health screening will be conducted on each animal. Step 5: After your Service Dog's eye examination is complete, we will provide you with a copy of your examination form and fax an additional copy to your primary care veterinarian to complete your medical records upon your next appointment. Your veterinarian is an integral part of the team needed to keep your Service Dog health. Data collected on each animal will remain private and be utilized for research purposes only. Remember, you MUST pre-register @ www.acvoeyeexam.org prior to making your appointment with the veterinary ophthalmologist. Registration for the 2013 event runs April 1st-30th with appointments booked throughout the month of May. Further questions/information can also be attained via our website at www.ivghospitals.com or by calling and speaking with a member of the Port City Ophthalmology Team at (603)433-0056.           [post_title] => 2013 National Service Dog Free Eye Exam Event! [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 2013-national-service-dog-free-eye-exam-event [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-02-20 14:24:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-02-20 19:24:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?p=4043 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2566 [post_author] => 5 [post_date] => 2012-03-05 12:00:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2012-03-05 17:00:54 [post_content] =>   The 5th Annual ACVO®/Merial® National Service Dog Eye Exam Event brings together veterinary ophthalmologists and thousands of service dogs for free eye exams.

 Registration begins April 1st-30th  for the May 2012 event.

During the month of May 2012, the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists (ACVO) is launching the 5th annual ACVO/Merial National Service Dog Eye Exam Event to help serve these dogs who dedicate their lives to serving the public. More than 180 board certified veterinary ophthalmologists throughout the U.S., as well as Canada and Puerto Rico, traditionally elect to provide free sight-saving eye exams to thousands of service dogs. Registration for service dog owners and handlers begins April 1, 2011. During the complete ocular exam, the veterinary specialists will look for problems including: redness, squinting, cloudy corneas, retinal disease, early cataracts and other serious abnormalities. Early detection and treatment are vital to these working dogs. Last year, more than 3,200 active service dogs received free eye exams throughout the month of May. A sampling of groups served since the ACVO/Merial National Service Dog Eye Exam Event launched in 2008 include: Transportation Security Agency (TSA), military working dogs, local fire, rescue, and police agencies, and also individual service dog owners and handlers who rely on these amazing animals daily.  DOES YOUR SERVICE DOG QUALIFY?  To qualify, animals must be “active working animals” that were certified by a formal training program or organization or are currently enrolled in a formal training program. Guide dogs, handicapped assistance dogs, detection dogs, police dogs, search and rescue dogs and formally trained and certified therapy dogs (through the Delta Society or similar) qualify. The certifying organization could be national, regional or local in nature. Essentially the dogs need to have some sort of certification and/or training paperwork to qualify for this particular program. Other service animals are welcome to participate (i.e. horses, cats, etc.), as long as they meet the stated qualifications. Additional registration details can be found at www.acvoeyeexam.org THE FOLLOWING STEPS MUST BE COMPLETED TO PARTICIPATE: Step 1: In order to receive the free eye examination you must FIRST register online for this event at www.acvoeyeexam.org A confirmation and registration number will be sent to your e-mail address after registration. You will need to provide the registration number when scheduling your appointment with the ophthalmologist. If you do not register, you cannot participate in the event.   Step 2: Once you have registered, the web site will push you through to a page that will allow you to search by state to locate a clinic near you. (Clinics may not be available in every state.)  Step 3: After locating the clinic you would like to visit, call their office directly, identify yourself as participating in the ACVO Service Dog event and make an appointment providing the registration number you attained. The dates and times that this program is offered may vary from clinic to clinic throughout the month of May. We suggest you register early in April to ensure a better chance of securing an appointment at your preferred clinic. Those who wait to register may find it difficult to find a clinic with open slots.   Step 4: Visit the ophthalmologist at the appointed time. Please call ahead if you will be late or have to cancel your appointment.  During the examination an eye health screening will be conducted on each animal. The complimentary eye exam through your veterinary ophthalmologist is of a screening nature. Should more services be needed or desired, you may discuss your options with the specialist. It is expected that the majority of animals will be healthy and will not be in need of additional services. But should such a need arise, your veterinary ophthalmologist is the expert that can discuss the condition, present options and best treat your animal.  Step 5: After your Service Dog's eye examination is complete, your veterinary ophthalmologist will provide you with a copy of your examination form and information. Please take this back to your primary care veterinarian to complete your medical records upon your next appointment. Your veterinarian is an integral part of the team needed to keep your Service Dog health.  Data collected on each animal will remain private and be utilized for research purposes only.  Remember, you MUST pre-register @ www.acvoeyeexam.org prior to making your appointment with the veterinary ophthalmologist. Registration for the 2012 event runs April 1st-30th with appointments booked throughout the month of May.  Further questions/information can also be attained via our website at www.ivghospitals.com or by calling and speaking with a member of the Port City Ophthalmology Team at (603)433-0056. [post_title] => 2012 National Service Dog Free Eye Exam Event! [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 2012-national-service-dog-free-eye-exam-event [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2012-03-05 12:00:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2012-03-05 17:00:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?p=2566 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2027 [post_author] => 5 [post_date] => 2011-12-19 17:39:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-12-19 22:39:25 [post_content] => Roxy, a 1 year old, Golden Retriever mix recently rescued from Arkansas was referred to the Ophthalmology Department at Port City Veterinary Referral Hospital because of the suspicion for acute ocular trauma.  Her left eye's anterior chamber was filled with blood and the eye was generally inflamed.   No signs of external trauma were noted during the examination.  With the aid of the slit lamp, Dr. Cassotis was able to confirm the presence of an adult roundworm within the anterior chamber of the left eye.  The worm looked like a long, whispy, rapidly moving object "swimming" rapidly in the blood tinged aqueous humor.   Since the worms are very sensitive to light, it became hyperactive when illuminated making it easier to identify. Bleeding in the eye is a serious concern and despite the presence of the worm, the inflammation and hemorrhage in the eye required initial treatment.  Roxy was treated with topical steroids to reduce inflammation and also resolve the intraocular hemorrhage.  The result was excellent (see picture above).  No adhesions, scars, or cataracts had developed.  The retinal examination was normal.  Her vision was clinically normal.  The worm though was still alive and active. Once inflammation was reduced, the decision for surgical removal of the worm was made.  The plan was to have Roxy undergo microsurgery.  Under the influence of general anesthesia and with the assistance of an operating microscope, a single incision was created into the cornea to enter the inside of the eye.  A thick fluid called viscosurgical device was injected into the opposite side of the chamber.  This fluid prevented the worm from swimming.  As the viscosurgical device was injected, the normal fluid of the eye was released through the incision.  As the incision was widened, the worm passively followed the fluid as it was intentionally let out of the eye.   The 6cm, long worm was gently grasped and withdrawn.   New fluid filled the eye and the incision was closed with suture.  Roxy made an excellent recovery (see picture below) and has undergone systemic deworming therapy since the removal of the worm was made.   [post_title] => Roundworm Migration into the Eye [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => roundworm-migration-into-the-eye [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2012-02-29 15:03:58 [post_modified_gmt] => 2012-02-29 20:03:58 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?p=2027 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1921 [post_author] => 5 [post_date] => 2011-10-18 09:28:50 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-10-18 13:28:50 [post_content] =>

 Glaucoma is a disease most commonly diagnosed by veterinarians as an increase in the normal pressure within the eye which can lead to pain and loss of vision.  Diagnosing the disease requires recognition of the early clinical signs, pressure evaluation, and ophthalmic examination.  Unfortunately glaucoma is frequently misdiagnosed because the early clinical sign are similar to those of other eye diseases, and many owners/companions do not realize how quickly the blinding disease occurs.  Too often it is identified after irreversible changes occur in one or both eyes. The normal physiology of the eye calls for an equal rate of fluid production and fluid drainage from the eye.  Cells of the ciliary body (located behind the iris) are responsible for production of the intraocular fluid (aqueous humor) which delivers a clear nutrient rich fluid to the clear structures of the eye.  This fluid circulates from behind the iris into the anterior chamber.  To keep the eye at normal volume and pressure, the aqueous then leaves via an intraocular drain known as the iridocorneal angle. If drainage is not occurring properly, then pressure rises because the delivery of fluid continues.  In animal species this scenario of a blockage in the outflow of aqueous humor and a subsequent build-up of pressure within the eye is the most common factor leading to vision loss.  Glaucoma related blindness occurs because the elevated pressure causes retinal nerve degeneration and blocks the visual impulse through the optic nerve.  Because permanent loss of vision can occur very quickly (within 24 hours), recognition of clinical signs is essential to having treatment options for the prevention of vision loss.         CLASSIFICATION OF GLAUCOMA Primary glaucoma is seen in certain breeds and is often thought to be inherited.  The following are types of primary glaucoma: Secondary glaucoma is a result of some other ocular disorder that interferes with the drainage of ocular fluid.  Some examples include: DIAGNOSIS OF GLAUCOMA Tonometry is the measure of intraocular pressure (IOP).  A variety of instruments are used to measure pressure in animals.  Most commonly applanation tonometers (TonoPens), rebound tonometers (TonoVet), or indentation tonometers (Schiotz) indirectly measure the pressure within the eye in mmHg.  Pressures less than 24mmHg are normal, however as animals age pressure decreases.  Therefore normal puppies may have readings of 24mmHg and a 10 year old may have 10mmHg.  Interpretation of the pressure is again just one factor is establishing a diagnosis of glaucoma.   Gonioscopy is a technique used to evaluate the iridocorneal angle. A dome-shaped contact lens (goniolens) is placed on the corneal surface to permit direct visualization of the drainage angle. Gonioscopy is helptful in evaluating the eye for its predisposition to glaucoma or for the risk of future glaucoma attacks. Retinal and optic nerve head examination with direct or indirect ophthalmoscopy.  These are means of directly looking at each of these structures to understand the presence, extent/severity of damage.All of these methods are necessary for establishing a prognosis and treatment options.   SIGNS OF GLAUCOMA One of the most important things for you, the owner, is to be able to recognize the earliest signs. Early signs may include: Chronic signs of glaucoma

TREATMENT

Glaucoma is an ophthalmic emergency and must be treated immediately and aggressively. As mentioned above, if the pressure remains elevated, permanent vision loss occurs.

Several options are available depending on whether the patient still has vision, the classification of glaucoma, concomitant systemic disease of the patient, and financial considerations. Medical treatment strategies for primary glaucoma involves applying various eye drops to the eye.  The topical medications either improve the outflow of fluid from the eye or slow the production of fluid. Which of the medications is selected will depend of a variety of factors and is the decision of your veterinarian or veterinary ophthalmologist. These medications need to be given very regularly (2-3 times daily in some cases) without fail if there is to be any hope to preserving vision in the affected eye.  The other “good” eye should also be monitored very regularly and treated to delay onset of the disease. In dogs, medications can be administered and delay the return of elevated pressures.  Unfortunately the pressures will elevate again which obviates the need for other forms of long term management. In animals where medications are insufficient to control the intraocular pressure surgery is performed to place a shunt (gonioimplant) in the eye to drain excess fluid into the frontal sinus.  Other implants are being researched for their success in treating canine and feline glaucoma. Alternate surgical options include intra- or extra- ocular laser delivery ablation of the ciliary body cells.  This slows the production of fluid into the eye. All surgical options entail risk.  The success rates of surgery for glaucoma are not as high as those for other routine intraocular surgeries such as cataract surgery.  There are many factors leading to these lowered success rates including timing to referral, classification of the glaucoma, patient and owner compliance with post operative care, and coincident ophthalmic disease.  Determining if a patient is a surgical candidate and the risks of the surgery are reviewed during the appointment. If a patient's eye is too advanced for vision sparing surgeries and has a non-visual eye with painful glaucoma, then other surgical options exist.   [post_title] => Understanding Glaucoma [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => understanding-glaucoma [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2012-02-29 15:04:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2012-02-29 20:04:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?p=1921 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1711 [post_author] => 5 [post_date] => 2011-06-06 11:14:18 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-06-06 15:14:18 [post_content] => This is a great story we wanted to share!! Randy Pierce is the founder of the nonprofit organization 2020 VisionQuest. He, along with his service dog Quinn is on route in becoming the first blind person to hike all 48 New Hampshire peaks over 4,000 feet! He recently visited UNH's Child Study and Development Center where he educated children on understanding blindness, teamwork with service dogs, and achieving goals. The link below is the article from the University Of New Hampshire's Campus Journal. http://www.unh.edu/news/campusjournal/2011/May/25csdc.cfm More information on 2020 VisionQuest provided in the link below. You can also follow blogs, including one by Quinn, the service dog! http://www.2020visionquest.org/about-us.html [post_title] => Blind Hiker, Service Dog Duo to Hike all 48 NH Peaks Over 4,000 Feet! [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => blind-hiker-service-dog-duo-to-hike-all-48-nh-peaks-over-4000-feet [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2012-02-28 10:37:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2012-02-28 15:37:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?p=1711 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1606 [post_author] => 5 [post_date] => 2011-05-03 17:48:20 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-05-03 21:48:20 [post_content] => Early diagnosis and treatment of ophthalmic conditions can improve the potential for full functional recovery of vision and prevention of further disease.  Help is available for alpaca owners and veterinarians alike.   All aspects of ophthalmic care from examination, topical medical management, lavage system placement, to microsurgical repair is available now at Port City Veterinary Referral Hospital. This alpaca patient was seen for severe corneal disease.  A deep corneal laceration and resultant abscess was initially diagnosed.  The severity of the process unfortunately resulted in blindness.  The eye however was able to be saved and removal was not necessary.   Alpaca patients are able to be seen now at the Port City Veterinary Referral Hospital's Ophthalmology Department. [post_title] => Ophthalmology for Alpacas at Port City Veterinary Referral Hospital [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 1606 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2012-02-28 10:37:47 [post_modified_gmt] => 2012-02-28 15:37:47 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?p=1606 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1547 [post_author] => 5 [post_date] => 2011-04-07 16:25:01 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-04-07 20:25:01 [post_content] => "Cataract, You and Your Pet" is a video produced by The American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists (www.acvo.com) for pet owners considering cataract surgery. The video provides information on the causes, detection and treatment of cataracts, with segments of the actual surgery being performed under the operating microscope. ACVO Cataract, You and Your Pet [post_title] => So your pet needs cataract surgery... now what?! Watch this video to learn more! [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => so-your-pet-needs-cataract-surgery-now-what-what-this-video-to-learn-more [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2011-06-06 11:16:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2011-06-06 15:16:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?p=1547 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 7 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 4043 [post_author] => 5 [post_date] => 2013-02-20 14:24:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-02-20 19:24:31 [post_content] =>

The 6th Annual ACVO®/Merial® National Service Dog Eye Exam Event brings together veterinary ophthalmologists and thousands of service animals for free eye exams.

 Registration runs from April 1st-30th, for the May 2013 event

The American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists (ACVO) is launching the 6th annual ACVO/Merial National Service Dog Eye Exam Event in the month of May, to screen service animals who dedicate their lives to serving the public. More than 250 board certified veterinary ophthalmologists throughout the U.S., as well as Canada and Puerto Rico, will be donating their time and resources to provide free, sight-saving eye exams to thousands of eligible service animals. Registration runs from April 1st-30th at www.ACVOEyeExam.org

A sampling of groups served since the ACVO/Merial National Service Dog Eye Exam Event launched in 2008 include: Transportation Security Agency (TSA), military working dogs, Puppies Behind Bars, an organization providing psychiatric service dogs to soldiers coming home from Iraq and Afghanistan, local fire, rescue, and police agencies, and also individual service dog owners and handlers who rely on these amazing animals daily.

WHAT VETERINARY OPHTHALMOLOGISTS LOOK FOR DURING THE EXAM: Dr. Nick Cassotis, DVM, DACVO performs a complete ocular exam utilizing specialty equipment to look for problems including: redness, squinting, corneal disease and retinal disease, early cataracts and other serious abnormalities. Early detection and treatment are vital to these working animals. The complimentary eye exam is of a screening nature. Should more services be needed or desired, you may discuss your options with the specialist. It is expected that the majority of animals will be healthy and will not be in need of additional services. But should such a need arise, we will discuss the condition, present options and best treat your animal. DOES YOUR SERVICE DOG QUALIFY? To qualify, animals must be “active working animals” that were certified by a formal training program or organization or are currently enrolled in a formal training program. The certifying organization could be national, regional or local in nature. Essentially the animals need to have some sort of certification and/or training paperwork to qualify for this particular program. Other serviceanimals are welcome to participate (i.e. horses, cats, etc.), as long as they meet the stated qualifications.  More information on qualifications can be found at www.acvoeyeexam.org. THE FOLLOWING STEPS MUST BE COMPLETED TO PARTICIPATE: Step 1: In order to receive the free eye examination you must FIRST register online for this event at www.acvoeyeexam.org  A confirmation and registration number will be sent to your e-mail address after registration. You will need to provide the registration number when scheduling your appointment with us.  If you do not register, you cannot participate in the event.  Step 2: Once you have registered, the web site will push you through to a page that will allow you to search by state to locate a clinic near you. (Clinics may not be available in every state.) Step 3: After locating Port City Veterinary Referral Hospital, call our office at (603)433-0056 and identify yourself as participating in the ACVO Service Dog event to make an appointment. You must provide the registration number you attained. The dates and times for an appointment vary throughout the month of May. We suggest you register early in April to ensure a better chance of securing an appointment. Those who wait to register may find it difficult to find open time slots of your choosing. Step 4: Visit the ophthalmologist at the appointed time. Please call ahead if you will be late or have to cancel your appointment.  During the examination an eye health screening will be conducted on each animal. Step 5: After your Service Dog's eye examination is complete, we will provide you with a copy of your examination form and fax an additional copy to your primary care veterinarian to complete your medical records upon your next appointment. Your veterinarian is an integral part of the team needed to keep your Service Dog health. Data collected on each animal will remain private and be utilized for research purposes only. Remember, you MUST pre-register @ www.acvoeyeexam.org prior to making your appointment with the veterinary ophthalmologist. Registration for the 2013 event runs April 1st-30th with appointments booked throughout the month of May. Further questions/information can also be attained via our website at www.ivghospitals.com or by calling and speaking with a member of the Port City Ophthalmology Team at (603)433-0056.           [post_title] => 2013 National Service Dog Free Eye Exam Event! [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 2013-national-service-dog-free-eye-exam-event [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-02-20 14:24:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-02-20 19:24:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?p=4043 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 7 [max_num_pages] => 1 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => 1 [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_404] => [is_comments_popup] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash] => 9d51176723efc0474e353dc42a0d4b32 [query_vars_changed] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => )