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                    [post_date] => 2018-01-10 16:38:21
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                    [post_content] => With record-breaking low temperatures this winter, the weather outside is frightful and it is especially important to keep our pets warm and cozy. While many may scoff at the idea of putting clothes on animals, it can be a very important safety preventive to avoid hypothermia or even frostbite.

It is a normal part of our own routine to put on a winter jacket, boots, and gloves before braving the cold, and it can become normal for your canine companion too. Even indoor cats can benefit from some extra warmth to stay snug during the cold weather months.

Here are a few ideas to keep your pets toasty warm and safe this winter:

 1. Dog Coats

A coat is a must-have basic for most dogs when they go outside in the winter, whether it be for playtime in the snow or for a quick bathroom run. Even for the fluffiest of dogs, it is a good idea to have an extra layer of insulation to ensure minimal exposure to freezing temperatures. You can find dog coats in a wide variety of colors, materials, shapes and sizes and styles. Dog coats can be utilitarian – warm and waterproof – they can show off your pup’s fabulous fashionista sense of style and glamor with hoods, fur trimmings and bling. Jester picluka      

 

2. Dog Booties

No matter how hardy your dog is, their paws need protection against snow, ice, road salt, and de-icers. There are boots specially made for dogs with grips for traction, water-resistant material, and flexibility so they can walk naturally. With a little bit of training in the house, like Jester… …your dog will soon be a pro like Luka:

3. Heated Bedding for Cold Pets

A pet-heating pad, heated pet bed, or a heated blanket, there are even self-heating beds for cats (and small dogs) are a great way to keep your cat warm inside on cold days, or help your dog fall into a deep, restorative sleep on cold nights. Heated gear made specifically for pets ensures that they warm up to the perfect temperature and can be therapeutic for joints and arthritis. Lily the fifteen-year-old kitty says her heated blanket is purrfect! IMG_8898          

4. Scarf

A dog scarf is a stylish way to keep your pooch looking and feeling cozy in the cold. It can be an extra layer of warmth and comfort and also a source of security for anxiety. The best part about dog scarves is that you can just repurpose one of your old fleece or infinity scarves into a scarf for your dog, like Miley: IMG_8889              

 5. Sweater

A pet sweater is another way to keep your dog or cat warm indoors or outdoors. Buying a larger size and a soft material like cotton, fleece, or wool is important to prevent breathing restriction or itchiness. They’re cute, warm, and you can even get your pets in the holiday spirit like Brady and Floyd: IMG_6714             For the safety of your pets, it is best to keep dogs and cats indoors as much as possible when the temperature falls below freezing (32 degrees Fahrenheit). If you are taking them out for a walk or hike, dress them warmly and monitor them for signs of illness (excessive shaking, shallow breathing, muscle stiffness, anything out of the ordinary). And if you need us, we will be here.   [post_title] => Sweater Weather: 5 Ways to Keep Your Pets Warm This Winter [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => sweater-weather-5-ways-to-keep-your-pets-safe-and-warm-this-winter [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-01-10 16:38:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-01-10 21:38:41 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?p=9634 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9622 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2018-01-03 13:44:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-01-03 18:44:23 [post_content] =>

This article was published in JAVMA

January 1, 2018, Vol. 252, No. 1, Pages 75-83 Authors: Debra C. Sellon DVM, PhD, Katherine Martucci, DVM; John R. Wenz, DVM, MS; Denis J. Marcellin-Little, DEDV; Michelle Powers, DVM, MS; Kimberley L. Cullen, PhD Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164. (Sellon, Martucci, Wenz); Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27607. (Marcellin-Little); Massachusetts Veterinary Referral Hospital, 20 Cabot Rd, Woburn, MA 01801. (Powers); Institute for Work and Health, 481 University Ave, Ste 800, Toronto, ON M5G 2E9 Canada. (Cullen) OBJECTIVE To identify potential risk factors for digit injuries in dogs training and competing in agility events. DESIGN Internet-based, retrospective, cross-sectional survey. ANIMALS 1,081 dogs training or competing in agility events. PROCEDURES Data were collected for eligible animals via retrospective surveys distributed electronically to handlers of dogs participating in agility-related activities. Variables evaluated included demographic (handlers) and signalment (dogs) information, physical characteristics of dogs, and injury characteristics. A separate survey of dogs competing in similar agility-related activities but without digit injuries was also administered. Multivariable logistic regression was used to develop a model for assessment of risk factors. RESULTS Data were collected from 207 agility dogs with digit injuries and 874 agility dogs without digit injuries. Factors associated with significantly increased odds of injury included Border Collie breed (OR, 2.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5 to 3.3), long nails (OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.3 to 4.5), absence of front dewclaws (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.3 to 2.6), and greater weight-to-height ratio (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.1 to 2.0). Odds of injury decreased with increasing age of the dog (OR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.76 to 0.86).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results should be cautiously interpreted because of potential respondent and recall bias and lack of review of medical records. Nevertheless, results suggested that retaining healthy dewclaws, maintaining lean body mass, and trimming nails short for training and competition may decrease the likelihood of digit injuries. Research to investigate training practices, obstacle construction specifcations, and surface considerations for dogs competing in agility activities is indicated.

The complete article is available to JAVMA subscribers here [post_title] => A survey of risk factors for digit injuries among dogs training and competing in agility events [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => a-survey-of-risk-factors-for-digit-injuries-among-dogs-training-and-competing-in-agility-events [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-01-03 16:14:52 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-01-03 21:14:52 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?p=9622 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9609 [post_author] => 21 [post_date] => 2018-01-02 08:44:27 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-01-02 13:44:27 [post_content] => Dr. Gervais from Boston West removed a foreign body out of a patient's cornea. A small piece of plant material got into Maisey's eye over the holidays. She was taken to the hospital where Dr. Gervais performed  a conjunctival flap to aid in the healing. WARNING: there is a close-up photo of Maisey's eye that may be graphic for some.  Click here to go  back to Boston West's Facebook Page.  IMG_2220 IMG_2221                 [caption id="attachment_9612" align="alignleft" width="224"]IMG_2222 Foreign body: a small piece of plant material[/caption]                   IMG_2223                       Click here to go  back to Boston West's Facebook Page. [post_title] => Boston West: Foreign Body in Patient's Cornea [Photos] [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => boston-west-foreign-body-in-patients-cornea-photos [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-01-02 08:44:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-01-02 13:44:27 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?p=9609 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9584 [post_author] => 21 [post_date] => 2017-12-21 10:23:52 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-21 15:23:52 [post_content] => If you are anything like me, and you love snacking, you might be trying to find healthier ways to snack. Coincidentally enough, my dogs also love snacks. As a dog mom, I want what is best for them, and that includes what they eat. I started to realize that all these cookies and biscuits are probably not the best way to show love to my pup. I started doing some research about healthy alternatives for dogs and was amazed what a little creativity and minimal effort can do! I have tried many different recipes, here are a few of my favorites:  

Pumpkin PopsScreen-Shot-2013-07-16-at-9.51.52-AM-300x185

This is one of my favorite and probably one of the easiest recipes you will find. Grab some ice trays, or buy some new ones in fun shapes, and spoon the pumpkin into the trays. Store remaining pumpkin in the fridge, for another day. Freeze for at least 2 hours and watch your pup’s eyes light up! You can also mix in yogurt, peanut butter, or banana for a new spin on this treat. Be careful not to purchase pumpkin pie filling in a can, it is full of sugar.

Frozen Dogurt320x480

Another easy treat to whip together! Mix the yogurt and berries in a bowl and then spoon the mixture into ice trays (or some small paper cups). Freeze for at least two hours and share! You can substitute any fruit. Diced apples, pears or baby carrots work too if that’s what you have on hand.

Sweet Potato ChewsUnknown

Cut the sweet potato length wise into strips no thicker than ¼ inch. Place the strips on a baking pan lined with parchment paper. Bake for 2 hours at 250 degrees. If your pup likes more chew to his potato, add another half hour to cooking time.

Mini Snowman Nosescarrots-for-dogs-main

Most dogs love carrots. Having a bag of carrots on hand is a great way to shower your pup with crunchy, sweet, healthy treats.
We would love to hear about recipes you have tried for your pup! Share them with us on our social media channels. Remember to always consult your regular veterinarian before feeding your pet a new treat if your pet has any medical concerns, or allergies.  

RELATED BLOG POSTS

Healthy Weight: Reasons to keep your pet in shape Healthy Activities & Exercises for Obese Pets   [post_title] => Easy Homemade Healthy Dog Treats [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => easy-homemade-healthy-dog-treats [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-21 10:23:52 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-21 15:23:52 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?p=9584 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9525 [post_author] => 21 [post_date] => 2017-12-16 14:10:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-16 19:10:23 [post_content] => I don’t know about you guys, but my favorite ones to shop for on my (exceedingly long) Christmas list are my pets. My fur kids are what make my life merry and bright all year round, and they deserve to be spoiled rotten come the holidays – and they certainly are! I love the new, interactive, and adorable pet-related items and watching their curiosity turn to excitement when they get their presents on Christmas morning is priceless. Some of these are classics, while others are brand spanking new; here are my top 10 pet gifts for 2017:

#1: Matching Dog/Human Pajamas

I’m pretty sure this is a new thing this year, and all I can say is, "what took so long!?" I’ll take four please. Where you can find it: fabdog.com [caption id="attachment_9527" align="alignleft" width="226"]Image from: fabdog.com Image from: fabdog.com[/caption]                

#2: Peek and Play Cat Toy Box

Full disclosure: I bought this one for my Floyd this year. Though I haven’t given it to him yet, I have a good feeling about it. If your cat enjoys hiding their toys and treasures (aka all my missing bobby pins) in random places, you’ll understand. Where you can find it: chewy.com [caption id="attachment_9533" align="alignleft" width="220"]Image from: Heavy.com Image from: Heavy.com[/caption]          

#3: Supplements

When my little 'ole Casey was still with us, joint supplements were a stocking stuffer must-have for his old, arthritic doggie joints. You could even throw in a box of Heartgard or flea & tick medication. Pricey, but practical. Where you can find it: your local Petco/Petsmart, veterinary offices, or online pet pharmacies [caption id="attachment_9537" align="alignleft" width="221"]Image from: chewy.com Image from: chewy.com[/caption]            

#4: That Squeaker Toy

This is a staple item for my pup Brady. Not any one in particular, but the more squeakers the better. Like this one that has sixteen squeakers! Grab your ear plugs. (Be sure to monitor your pup during play time in case any squeaker gets free. Dispose of the toy and parts once your dog wins the battle.) Where you can find them: any pet store or pet aisle virtually anywhere. This one is on chewy.com [caption id="attachment_9542" align="alignleft" width="209"]Image from: chewy.com Image from: chewy.com[/caption]              

#5: A Box

I dedicate this one to all the minimalist cats who just need a nice box to keep them happy. Sleeping, playing, scratching; they may just live in it. Where to find one: if you’re an online shopper, you’re all set.        

#6: Holiday Cookies

Honestly, a little package of holiday dog or cat treats are adorable and look good enough for humans to eat! Your pet is bound to love this great treat. Where you can find them: pet stores or online. These are from Petsmart: [caption id="attachment_9554" align="alignleft" width="187"]Image from: petsmart.com Image from: petsmart.com[/caption]              

#7: Bed, Blanket, and Pillow Gift Set

I buy these for Brady every year because they’re just so darn cute and cozy. They are washable, but he’s a good boy and he deserves an annual upgrade every December. Where you can find it: petsmart.com [caption id="attachment_9547" align="alignleft" width="193"]Image from: petsmart.com Image from: petsmart.com[/caption]              

#8: Turbo Scratcher

The name says it all. I got one for Floyd last year and he went bananas, and a year later he still has a blast. Although, the ball goes off the rails and disappears every now and then. This marks the start of a new game: ball hunter! Where you can find it: chewy.com [caption id="attachment_9553" align="alignleft" width="232"]Image from: chewy.com Image from: chewy.com[/caption]            

#9: Chuckit! Launcher

My lazy, couch potato of a dog wouldn’t be interested in this one, but I’ve seen some pretty happy dogs (and owners) on beaches and in parks using this nifty tool. It’s a win-win: pet owners can throw the ball further without dislocating their shoulders, and dogs get to run much further to get the ball – we all know a tired pup is a good pup, so win-win! Where you can find it: Petco, Petsmart, or chewy.com [caption id="attachment_9561" align="alignleft" width="190"]Image from: petco.com Image from: petco.com[/caption]              

#10: Hide a Squirrel Puzzle Dog Toy

This one was recommended by a coworker who claims her dog LOVES it. There’s even different themes, from squirrels in a tree (like this one) to peas in a pod! Puzzle toys are great for keeping dogs busy and entertained, but he/she may require assistance once all of the squirrels have successfully been removed and a refill is in order. Where you can find it: chewy.com [caption id="attachment_9563" align="alignleft" width="208"]Image from: chewy.com Image from: chewy.com[/caption]                   And there you have it! Of course, be sure to consult with your veterinarian before giving your pet any new treats, supplements, or toys that you’re unsure of. And lastly, have fun! There’s plenty of cool, wacky, and adorable pet products out there to choose from. What will your pet find under the tree this Christmas?             [post_title] => Santa Paws: My 2017 Holiday Pet Gift Guide [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => santa-paws-my-2017-holiday-pet-gift-guide [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-16 14:10:23 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-16 19:10:23 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?p=9525 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9450 [post_author] => 21 [post_date] => 2017-11-14 16:35:41 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-14 21:35:41 [post_content] => November is Adopt a Senior Pet Month, and we at Ethos Veterinary Health believe that pets at every age have their own unique beauty and value. We feel that spending time with a pet at every stage in its life and development is its own reward, worldly senior pets, bitey puppies, crazy kittens, the mature (thank goodness! Finally trained) middle years ... there is so much to be thankful for at every age. Unfortunately, 25% of animals surrendered to shelters are senior aged and are often overlooked by adopters who opt for  younger pets. Senior pets have so much to offer though, and are already veterans in the science of "good boy/girl-ology" (yes, it's a science now).  Our older pets can even teach us some valuable life lessons about love, friendship, and growing old. The next time you’re looking to adopt a new furry family member, don't pass on those wise old eyes, please consider giving a senior pet a second chance. Here are some things we all can learn from them, and some of the ways they will bring you joy:  

Lesson #1: Love Never Grows Old

A senior pet will slow down, take a few extra minutes to wake up in the morning, and may grow thinner with more gray hairs, but age never changes the love senior pets have for their humans. Their bodies grow old, but their love stays forever young. Photos for senior pet blog-01  

Lesson #2: Friendship Has No Expiration Date

Many senior pets, no matter how many homes and owners they’ve seen throughout their lives, will always be open to making new friends. In fact, they have mastered what it means to be a best friend in their years of experience. Photos for senior pet blog-02  

 Lesson #3: A Good Attitude is Everything

Age often brings ailments for senior pets, from arthritis to diseases to cancer. But through all the pain, medications, and trips to the vet they still manage to keep their tails wagging and their love unwavering. Photos for senior pet blog-03  

Lesson #4: A Kind Soul Takes Time

As pets age, they often become more mellow, sweeter, and enjoy the simpler, quieter things in life. Beneath the surface of even the grumpiest of old pets lies a sweet old soul that’s just a little rough around the edges. Photos for senior pet blog-04  

Lesson #5: Some Things Are Worth Waiting For

It is no secret that senior animals are often the last to get adopted in shelters. But they know better than anyone else that patience is a virtue and the time will come when they find a home worthy enough of their seasoned love. Photos for senior pet blog-05  

Lesson #6: There is No Shame in Growing Old

Inside every old pet is the young, energetic pup or kitten that they once were. Some senior pets are able to channel that youth in spurts of playtime and energy, while others are only young at heart. Either way, they aren’t afraid to take their time and live a lazy retired life. And that is just okay. Photos for senior pet blog-06  

Lesson #7: You Can Make a Difference

Welcoming a senior pet into your home can literally save a life. It is an incredibly rewarding kindness and though you won’t have as many years with them, you can make their golden years the best they deserve for which they will be forever grateful. You can be their hero. Photos for senior pet blog-07                 Before you adopt a senior pet, be sure that you are ready for the possibility of future medical expenses such as medications, supplements, senior blood panels, etc. Pet insurance is a great option for financial assistance, and luckily many pet insurance companies now offer plans for animals up to 14 years old. For help on picking the right insurance plan for you, read our Decisions in Pet Insurance blog for tips on how to get started. A senior pet can bring you years of happiness and memories and though you may need to slow down and have a little extra patience, you will surely receive lots and lots of love. [post_title] => 7 Important Lessons We Should Learn From Senior Pets [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 7-important-lessons-we-should-learn-from-senior-pets [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-27 12:34:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-27 17:34:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?p=9450 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9435 [post_author] => 21 [post_date] => 2017-10-26 16:13:41 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-10-26 20:13:41 [post_content] => "Bulger Veterinary Hospital has received numerous inquiries regarding a recent case of a puppy that ingested an unknown opioid.  The puppy in question found and nosed around in an empty cigarette box.  Subsequently, she collapsed and was brought into Bulger.  She was weak, recumbent, and had a low heart rate.  Due to these signs as well as the sudden onset in an otherwise healthy puppy, and the history of encountering the trash just before the collapse, a toxin was suspected.  Naloxone, the drug that is the reversal agent for opioids, was administered and the signs quickly resolved.  Further details about the case are part of the medical record and cannot be released without the owner's specific consent, nor can the client's personal contact information be released as this information is confidential and subject to veterinary ethical and legal considerations. Opioid exposure in dogs has been occurring more frequently than in the past, although it is still not particularly common.  Far more common are marijuana ingestion and other toxins.  We do expect that with the ongoing opioid crisis, we will see more of these cases.  Cases are treatable if caught early, but can be fatal depending upon the dose, the specific drug they are exposed to, and the time between noting signs and coming to the vet.  These drugs have exactly the same effect on dogs as they do in people, and can be just as lethal with the increase in fentanyl-laced heroin as well as pure fentanyl substituted for heroin in street drugs. For veterinarians, this is no more shocking than any other toxin or item that pets can get exposed to.  Neither is the location of the exposure, as no town is immune from the opioid crisis.   Naloxone is not a new addition to our hospital formularies, as opioids are utilized in anesthesia and pain management protocols, and this agent has long been used to reverse these effects when needed. For owners concerned about how to avoid this type of exposure, our recommendations haven't changed.  Preventing our pets from eating, licking, etc anything they find on the street is still paramount, as is avoiding their exposure to anything that could cause them harm inside the house, whether it is an illegal substance, medications, or food items that may be toxic.  Receiving rapid treatment in the case of collapse or other severe disease is also important.  If you are aware of an illegal substance that your pet may have ingested within your home, this information is critical to the successful treatment of your pet, and we advise that you provide us with all information you can.  Medical records remain confidential except in cases of animal abuse, neglect, or when records are subpoenaed." -Dr. Krista Vernalaken, Medical Director at Bulger Veterinary Hospital  

Read the full article from the Eagle Tribune here.

[post_title] => In The News: Puppy Overdoses After Ingesting Opioid [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => in-the-news-puppy-overdoses-after-ingesting-opioid [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-10-26 16:18:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-10-26 20:18:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?p=9435 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9422 [post_author] => 21 [post_date] => 2017-10-10 15:52:03 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-10-10 19:52:03 [post_content] => When the weekend rolls around, there’s nothing I want to do more than hang out with my dogs.  Though I am usually perfectly happy going for a hike or checking out a local pet-friendly dog boutique, the stakes change in October. In October I feel obligated by some tradition that is older than I am, to seek out pet friendly breweries and celebrate Oktoberfest with my favorite furry friend. (He’s more of a water-drinker, but I don’t judge).thumbnail_IMG_7748 On my hunt for a suitable locale, I turned up a few options and felt like it was only right to both evaluate their offerings, and share my findings with you. So here they are – six dog friendly breweries in theBoston area. We are in no way affiliated by any of these breweries. We just like dogs and beer, and think they are better together. Enjoy.

Lord Hobo

Woburn, MA At Lord Hobo dogs are welcome inside, you may also get to meet their brewery dog, Boss (sometimes he even shares his toys)! Lord Hobo Brewing Co. loves having dogs in their tap room and they are always welcome at their brewery events. Website: https://lordhobobrewing.com

Night Shift Brewing

Everett, MA At Night Shift Brewing dogs are welcome on their patio area. Their patio is spacious, and some tables are shaded for the warmer weather. You can grab some food from a local food truck and play some corn hole with your canine friend by your side. Tuesdays during the summer months they host Paws + Pints sponsored by local animal organizations. Website: https://www.nightshiftbrewing.com

Notch Brewing

Salem, MA At Notch Brewing dogs are welcome in the biergarten. They have a lovely outdoor space that overlooks the river, and on a good day, it’s a great place to sit and stay. Salem is such a fun place to walk around so after some brews, treat your pup to a nice walk through town! Website: http://www.notchbrewing.com

American Fresh Brewhouse (Slumbrew)

Somerville, MA (Assembly Row location) Dogs are welcome at the Somerville Brewing Company outdoor beergarden in Assembly Row. They have a small food menu, but the menu does include pretzels, and, assuming you brought a human companion, they provide board games to encourage you to hang out and enjoy the day. Website: http://www.slumbrew.com/Assembly_Row

603 Brewery

Londonderry, NH This brewery may be a little smaller compared to the others, but they still welcome dogs of all sizes with open arms! Whether you're stopping by to grab a flight or get growler or 6-pack for later, the staff members are always happy to see dogs. Keep your eyes peeled for their adorable brewery cat, Mitzi! Website: https://603brewery.com

Redhook Brewery

Portsmouth, NH Dogs are welcome to hang out on the patio at Red Hook. The patio is large, there are plenty of tables and shade for warmer days. They have a pretty solid bar menu and of course, brews on tap. Website: http://redhook.com/breweries-pubs/portsmouth   All of these establishments welcome well behaved, leashed, friendly dogs. Off-leash dogs are not welcome, no matter how small. Let’s all do our part to make sure more and more places open their hearths and patios to our beloved fuzzy co-pilots. If you have any interest in venturing out to one of these places be sure to check their social media platforms and do always call ahead to make sure their policies haven’t changed before venturing out.   [post_title] => Smile: There’s Beers and Dog Friendly Breweries [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => smile-theres-beers-and-dog-friendly-breweries [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-10-11 08:33:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-10-11 12:33:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?p=9422 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9396 [post_author] => 21 [post_date] => 2017-09-28 17:18:29 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-28 21:18:29 [post_content] => Imagine a disease that could affect anyone, young or old, and can affect any mammal. The animal is bitten, then seems OK for a while. A few weeks pass and he or she starts to act funny, maybe a little listless, maybe kind of irrationally angry and aggressive.  You go near it and it bites you...then the same happens to you!  Sounds like something from a zombie movie, right? shutterstock_76201372 That disease is Rabies, and while nobody rises from the dead (as far as we know), symptoms of rabies look and sound like the early scenes in zombie apocalypse movies. Most pet owners think of rabies in passing. “Rabies: sounds bad.  Better get my pet her shot." And most of the time, that may be enough: it’s very bad and vaccines can prevent it.  Maybe the disease conjures up images of "Old Yeller," and “Kujo” if you are of a generation that has seen these classic movies.  Maybe somewhere you heard that Edgar Allen Poe might have died of Rabies (one of many theories of his death). Most pet-owners are aware that the vaccine is required by law and that it is a disease that is communicable between animals and humans. Indeed, these things are true.  But what is Rabies really, and how likely is it that you will come into contact with an animal that has rabies?

What is Rabies?

Rabies is a viral disease.  Unlike most viral diseases, which are highly species-specific and can only really affect one species, rabies can infect all mammals. The disease is transmitted when a healthy animal is bitten by a rabid animal. Viral particles are present in the saliva of the rabid animal which are passed into the blood stream of the healthy animal.  Viral particles replicate in the healthy animal and migrate up the nerves and into the central nervous system, then out into the salivary glands.  At this point, the new animal is capable of transmitting the disease.  The time between being bitten and being capable of transmitting the disease is highly variable – usually this is 2-8 weeks, but there have been cases where it has been both shorter and longer. A pet or human is considered potentially exposed to rabies when bitten or scratched by any animal (wild or domestic), whether vaccinated or unvaccinated.  This is a tricky thing to understand, because it seemingly makes no sense – why is it considered rabies exposure if a vaccinated dog bites another vaccinated dog?  Because rabies is so very serious and fatal to any mammal that it infects that we can't afford to take ANY exposure lightly. No vaccination is 100% - so if a vaccine failure occurred there could still be a risk. To flip this on its head, what if we weren't strict about it?  What if the vaccine your pet received was a dud (or your pet was never vaccinated).  Not likely, but what if?  And then your dog goes out and eats a raccoon carcass he or she finds (don’t get me started on the crazy stuff well-fed dogs will eat!).  But because in our imaginary world laws about this aren't strict, no one does anything.  Everyone goes about their lives.  But 2 months later, your dog starts acting strangely.  It gets worse, but rabies isn't on their list because the signs aren't classic and rabies is rare.  You euthanize your dog, never knowing it had rabies.  You and your family were exposed, but didn't even realize it.  Your entire family could die of this, only realizing too late that earlier recognition would have saved all of you.  This is a dire and extremely unlikely scenario, but this is why we are so strict about it.

Rabies Protocols and Guidelines

There are set protocols in place in Massachusetts which provide vets and animal control officers with clear guidelines.  Here are some examples where humans or animals should be concerned about rabies exposure: These are just some of the situations that owners might not think they should be concerned about.

Vaccinations

Vaccination in pets (and humans when warranted) is considered highly effective.  Due to the severity of the disease, it is still treated very cautiously when there is a possible exposure.  But there haven't been many cases of definitive rabies vaccine failure.  Your best insurance is to keep your pet vaccinated. The law requires that all unvaccinated pets brought into a veterinary hospital be vaccinated.  That means that technically, if you bring your pet to me and it is unvaccinated or has an expired vaccine and is healthy enough to be vaccinated, I as a veterinarian MUST vaccinate.  I don't have the right to allow you to say no. And this applies to indoor cats and ferrets, too.  ALL mammals can get rabies.  This includes rodents and bats which may enter the home and interact with cats and ferrets.  It is true that rodents are considered excessively low risk, because they are so small that most of the time, if they were attacked by a rabid animal like a raccoon or coyote, they would be killed and therefore never able to infect another.  The state does not usually recommend testing dead mice you find in the house, unless there are extenuating circumstances. No vaccines exist for rabbits, guinea pigs, or other pocket pets.  But if a vaccine exists (dogs, cats, ferrets, and most large animals like horses and cattle) then your pets should be vaccinated. The ramifications of exposure to rabies are severe and fatal if untreated.

Treatment

If an animal or human is exposed to rabies but is treated in a timely fashion, it is considered 100% treatable. Treatment in animals consists usually of a booster vaccination and then some confinement or quarantine period based upon the previous vaccine status of the pet. Treatment in humans is immunoglobulins and a series of post-exposure vaccines.  Those at high risk, like vets and spelunkers (which I mention because I love that word, and also bats live in caves) should have pre-exposure vaccines, which makes post-exposure treatment much easier. But here is the bad part:  if not caught right after exposure and allowed to progress until signs appear, the disease is 99.9% fatal.  Completely Untreatable. There is no cure. Each state reports their rabies cases independently.  In Massachusetts, from 1992 to 2016, approximately 10% of submitted cases have come back positive.  This dipped slightly down to about 5% (the lowest point) from 2011 – 2013.  In 2016, the most common species to be positive were raccoons, skunks, bats, cats, foxes, and woodchucks. The good news is that cases identified in domestic animals are still quite rare, and human cases are even rarer in the US – only 1-3 cases are identified annually.  This is 3 cases too many.  And sadly, those who feel vaccinations cause grave side effects often use the rarity of the disease as a justification for not vaccinating.  The disease is rare BECAUSE we vaccinate.  Vaccination rates must continue to be high or the disease and associated deaths will increase. Fortunately, there may be hope on the horizon. There have only ever been been a total of 3 known people who have ever been successfully treated after signs appeared.  That's not a lot.  But 10 years ago, we would have said that there had never been a successfully treated case.  Prevention is still the best option, and this starts with awareness.  

More reading:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabies https://www.cdc.gov/rabies/ [post_title] => Rabies: what is it and why do we vaccinate? [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => rabies-what-is-it-and-why-do-we-vaccinate [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-10-09 12:43:34 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-10-09 16:43:34 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?p=9396 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9302 [post_author] => 21 [post_date] => 2017-09-19 11:27:04 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-19 15:27:04 [post_content] => Pet social media accounts have been steadily increasing in number, enabling some real distraction and cuteness overload for humans around the world. We can attest as the Ethos Creative Marketing team that these accounts have been proven to lower stress levels, stabilize blood pressure, and reduce tension after a long day. (These statements in no way have been proven or collaborated by a medical professional or the FDA, but we feel as marketers we are the experts when it comes to Instagram health.) Internet animals are a reliable, holistic, anti-stress medication. The wealth of options ranges from funny cat YouTube videos to your neighbor’s dog’s Facebook account. As an added bonus, they come with no side-effects, and do not require a prescription from a doctor. We support the growth of these accounts and want to share our favorites with you. From our perspective, we have selected the following accounts for the personality of the pet that hosts them, as well as their outstanding photography and storytelling. Please also note, we are in no way affiliated with any of these accounts, other than that we follow them and they bring us joy. Enjoy and proceed with caution:  
 

Lauren's Top 5

  FullSizeRender@brianthewirehairedvizsla This wirehaired gentleman hails from England and enjoys swimming, his ball, and playing with fellow wirehaired pups. Brian’s photos are bright and fun, but his videos stand out most when showing off his stubborn and hilarious personality. FullSizeRender-3@jasperthecowdog Jasper’s account is showered with professional level photography and it only helps that Jasper is one of the most photogenic dogs online. This account is for the adventure fan #adventuredogsofinstagram FullSizeRender-2 @louie_adventurecat Cats still dominate the internet and Louie is the most unique feline out there. His account is full of Louie’s kayaking and hiking adventures. He accompanies his humans on leash and really lives up to his Instagram handle. FullSizeRender-1   @ragtimejimmy Jimmy is another wirehaired canine that showcases great photography that tells a story without having to read the status below. It also helps that Jimmy is a handsome boy who is quite comfortable being a model. FullSizeRender-4 @stickypets Sticky Pets is home to multiple pets and even some wildlife photography. Their use of HDR (high dynamic range) photography makes this account stand out.  
 

Sommer's Top 5

  thumbnail_FullSizeRender-2@rafaelmantesso There is a soft spot in my heart for artists and epically well trained, sweet-heart dogs. The story here: Rafael’s girlfriend left him and took all the furniture. Left with nothing but a bare apartment, his dog (Jimmy) and some time on his hands, Rafael built himself a happy online home. Dogs will cure what ails you, is I think the overarching theme here. thumbnail_FullSizeRender@the_blueboys Derpy pittie brothers Darren and Phillip unquestionably rule the roost at their house. They wear silly outfits, they nap, they eat people-food and the content is written from a first-person (dog?) point of view. Darren and Phillip are living the life and they make mine a little brighter with their antics. thumbnail_FullSizeRender-4 @mugidal I love his photography. It’s unique and clever, he very clearly loves his dog to the moon and back and there is no doubt in my mind that the feeling is mutual. I can feel my blood pressure drop when his name pops up in my feed. thumbnail_FullSizeRender-1 @the_little_gsp Confession #1 – I’m a GSP mom. There, it’s out. I have watched little Piper grow up on Instagram and she is just as silly and adorable as my own little girl Jester. I feel like they would be friends. thumbnail_FullSizeRender-3 @otisbarkington Confession #2 – dogs in slouchy hats make me laugh. Otis owns the slouchy hat look. His page is another silly, happy feed the makes me forget my own worries and woes. When the internet can’t cut it, my own girls Jester and Windy are all the medicine I need.  
 

Rachel's Top 5

  thumbnail_Huskiesadventures@huskiesadventures If you’re looking for 3 of the most majestic (and fluffy) huskies out there, then this is the page for you. Zeus, Thunder, & Oakley are truly #huskygoals. Their owner frequently takes them to the most beautiful landscapes for breathtaking shoots. thumbnail_atchoumthecat @atchoumthecat No, this cat didn’t just wake up from a wild nap. Atchoum the Persian kitty has a rare condition called hypertricosis, also known as werewolf syndrome, which causes fast and continual hair growth. I personally can’t get enough of his bowties and mad scientist-like expressions. thumbnail_wallyandmolly @wally_and_molly Although Wally has crossed the rainbow bridge, his siblings Otis and Suki are just as adorable. These two English Angora rabbits are sure to brighten up your day with their crazy haircuts and hoppin’ personalities. Not to mention the captions are pure gold. thumbnail_bengalthor @bengalthor Thor is a gorgeous Bengal Cat that is prettier than most people I know. He captions the pictures that his “servant” takes of him with his own thoughts, and let me tell you he is quite the shrimp-loving ladies’ man. thumbnail_bearcoattonkey @bearcoat_tonkey So. Much. Smoosh. Tonkey the bear-coat Shar Pei (really, I’m convinced she’s actually part teddy bear) is the cutest ball of wrinkles I’ve ever seen. Look at the face. Follow the face. [post_title] => 15 Pet Instagram Accounts You Should Be Following [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 15-pet-instagram-accounts-you-should-be-following [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-19 11:43:52 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-19 15:43:52 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?p=9302 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 10 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9634 [post_author] => 21 [post_date] => 2018-01-10 16:38:21 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-01-10 21:38:21 [post_content] => With record-breaking low temperatures this winter, the weather outside is frightful and it is especially important to keep our pets warm and cozy. While many may scoff at the idea of putting clothes on animals, it can be a very important safety preventive to avoid hypothermia or even frostbite. It is a normal part of our own routine to put on a winter jacket, boots, and gloves before braving the cold, and it can become normal for your canine companion too. Even indoor cats can benefit from some extra warmth to stay snug during the cold weather months. Here are a few ideas to keep your pets toasty warm and safe this winter:

 1. Dog Coats

A coat is a must-have basic for most dogs when they go outside in the winter, whether it be for playtime in the snow or for a quick bathroom run. Even for the fluffiest of dogs, it is a good idea to have an extra layer of insulation to ensure minimal exposure to freezing temperatures. You can find dog coats in a wide variety of colors, materials, shapes and sizes and styles. Dog coats can be utilitarian – warm and waterproof – they can show off your pup’s fabulous fashionista sense of style and glamor with hoods, fur trimmings and bling. Jester picluka      

 

2. Dog Booties

No matter how hardy your dog is, their paws need protection against snow, ice, road salt, and de-icers. There are boots specially made for dogs with grips for traction, water-resistant material, and flexibility so they can walk naturally. With a little bit of training in the house, like Jester… …your dog will soon be a pro like Luka:

3. Heated Bedding for Cold Pets

A pet-heating pad, heated pet bed, or a heated blanket, there are even self-heating beds for cats (and small dogs) are a great way to keep your cat warm inside on cold days, or help your dog fall into a deep, restorative sleep on cold nights. Heated gear made specifically for pets ensures that they warm up to the perfect temperature and can be therapeutic for joints and arthritis. Lily the fifteen-year-old kitty says her heated blanket is purrfect! IMG_8898          

4. Scarf

A dog scarf is a stylish way to keep your pooch looking and feeling cozy in the cold. It can be an extra layer of warmth and comfort and also a source of security for anxiety. The best part about dog scarves is that you can just repurpose one of your old fleece or infinity scarves into a scarf for your dog, like Miley: IMG_8889              

 5. Sweater

A pet sweater is another way to keep your dog or cat warm indoors or outdoors. Buying a larger size and a soft material like cotton, fleece, or wool is important to prevent breathing restriction or itchiness. They’re cute, warm, and you can even get your pets in the holiday spirit like Brady and Floyd: IMG_6714             For the safety of your pets, it is best to keep dogs and cats indoors as much as possible when the temperature falls below freezing (32 degrees Fahrenheit). If you are taking them out for a walk or hike, dress them warmly and monitor them for signs of illness (excessive shaking, shallow breathing, muscle stiffness, anything out of the ordinary). And if you need us, we will be here.   [post_title] => Sweater Weather: 5 Ways to Keep Your Pets Warm This Winter [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => sweater-weather-5-ways-to-keep-your-pets-safe-and-warm-this-winter [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-01-10 16:38:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-01-10 21:38:41 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?p=9634 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 188 [max_num_pages] => 19 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => 1 [is_404] => [is_comments_popup] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash] => c705482ffbbc342a74d13ded980089e1 [query_vars_changed] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => )