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                    [post_content] => When the weekend rolls around, there’s nothing I want to do more than hang out with my dogs.  Though I am usually perfectly happy going for a hike or checking out a local pet-friendly dog boutique, the stakes change in October. In October I feel obligated by some tradition that is older than I am, to seek out pet friendly breweries and celebrate Oktoberfest with my favorite furry friend. (He’s more of a water-drinker, but I don’t judge).thumbnail_IMG_7748

On my hunt for a suitable locale, I turned up a few options and felt like it was only right to both evaluate their offerings, and share my findings with you. So here they are – six dog friendly breweries in theBoston area.

We are in no way affiliated by any of these breweries. We just like dogs and beer, and think they are better together. Enjoy.

Lord Hobo

Woburn, MA At Lord Hobo dogs are welcome inside, you may also get to meet their brewery dog, Boss (sometimes he even shares his toys)! Lord Hobo Brewing Co. loves having dogs in their tap room and they are always welcome at their brewery events. Website: https://lordhobobrewing.com

Night Shift Brewing

Everett, MA At Night Shift Brewing dogs are welcome on their patio area. Their patio is spacious, and some tables are shaded for the warmer weather. You can grab some food from a local food truck and play some corn hole with your canine friend by your side. Tuesdays during the summer months they host Paws + Pints sponsored by local animal organizations. Website: https://www.nightshiftbrewing.com

Notch Brewing

Salem, MA At Notch Brewing dogs are welcome in the biergarten. They have a lovely outdoor space that overlooks the river, and on a good day, it’s a great place to sit and stay. Salem is such a fun place to walk around so after some brews, treat your pup to a nice walk through town! Website: http://www.notchbrewing.com

American Fresh Brewhouse (Slumbrew)

Somerville, MA (Assembly Row location) Dogs are welcome at the Somerville Brewing Company outdoor beergarden in Assembly Row. They have a small food menu, but the menu does include pretzels, and, assuming you brought a human companion, they provide board games to encourage you to hang out and enjoy the day. Website: http://www.slumbrew.com/Assembly_Row

603 Brewery

Londonderry, NH This brewery may be a little smaller compared to the others, but they still welcome dogs of all sizes with open arms! Whether you're stopping by to grab a flight or get growler or 6-pack for later, the staff members are always happy to see dogs. Keep your eyes peeled for their adorable brewery cat, Mitzi! Website: https://603brewery.com

Redhook Brewery

Portsmouth, NH Dogs are welcome to hang out on the patio at Red Hook. The patio is large, there are plenty of tables and shade for warmer days. They have a pretty solid bar menu and of course, brews on tap. Website: http://redhook.com/breweries-pubs/portsmouth   All of these establishments welcome well behaved, leashed, friendly dogs. Off-leash dogs are not welcome, no matter how small. Let’s all do our part to make sure more and more places open their hearths and patios to our beloved fuzzy co-pilots. If you have any interest in venturing out to one of these places be sure to check their social media platforms and do always call ahead to make sure their policies haven’t changed before venturing out.   [post_title] => Smile: There’s Beers and Dog Friendly Breweries [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => smile-theres-beers-and-dog-friendly-breweries [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-10-11 08:33:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-10-11 12:33:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?p=9422 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9396 [post_author] => 21 [post_date] => 2017-09-28 17:18:29 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-28 21:18:29 [post_content] => Imagine a disease that could affect anyone, young or old, and can affect any mammal. The animal is bitten, then seems OK for a while. A few weeks pass and he or she starts to act funny, maybe a little listless, maybe kind of irrationally angry and aggressive.  You go near it and it bites you...then the same happens to you!  Sounds like something from a zombie movie, right? shutterstock_76201372 That disease is Rabies, and while nobody rises from the dead (as far as we know), symptoms of rabies look and sound like the early scenes in zombie apocalypse movies. Most pet owners think of rabies in passing. “Rabies: sounds bad.  Better get my pet her shot." And most of the time, that may be enough: it’s very bad and vaccines can prevent it.  Maybe the disease conjures up images of "Old Yeller," and “Kujo” if you are of a generation that has seen these classic movies.  Maybe somewhere you heard that Edgar Allen Poe might have died of Rabies (one of many theories of his death). Most pet-owners are aware that the vaccine is required by law and that it is a disease that is communicable between animals and humans. Indeed, these things are true.  But what is Rabies really, and how likely is it that you will come into contact with an animal that has rabies?

What is Rabies?

Rabies is a viral disease.  Unlike most viral diseases, which are highly species-specific and can only really affect one species, rabies can infect all mammals. The disease is transmitted when a healthy animal is bitten by a rabid animal. Viral particles are present in the saliva of the rabid animal which are passed into the blood stream of the healthy animal.  Viral particles replicate in the healthy animal and migrate up the nerves and into the central nervous system, then out into the salivary glands.  At this point, the new animal is capable of transmitting the disease.  The time between being bitten and being capable of transmitting the disease is highly variable – usually this is 2-8 weeks, but there have been cases where it has been both shorter and longer. A pet or human is considered potentially exposed to rabies when bitten or scratched by any animal (wild or domestic), whether vaccinated or unvaccinated.  This is a tricky thing to understand, because it seemingly makes no sense – why is it considered rabies exposure if a vaccinated dog bites another vaccinated dog?  Because rabies is so very serious and fatal to any mammal that it infects that we can't afford to take ANY exposure lightly. No vaccination is 100% - so if a vaccine failure occurred there could still be a risk. To flip this on its head, what if we weren't strict about it?  What if the vaccine your pet received was a dud (or your pet was never vaccinated).  Not likely, but what if?  And then your dog goes out and eats a raccoon carcass he or she finds (don’t get me started on the crazy stuff well-fed dogs will eat!).  But because in our imaginary world laws about this aren't strict, no one does anything.  Everyone goes about their lives.  But 2 months later, your dog starts acting strangely.  It gets worse, but rabies isn't on their list because the signs aren't classic and rabies is rare.  You euthanize your dog, never knowing it had rabies.  You and your family were exposed, but didn't even realize it.  Your entire family could die of this, only realizing too late that earlier recognition would have saved all of you.  This is a dire and extremely unlikely scenario, but this is why we are so strict about it.

Rabies Protocols and Guidelines

There are set protocols in place in Massachusetts which provide vets and animal control officers with clear guidelines.  Here are some examples where humans or animals should be concerned about rabies exposure: These are just some of the situations that owners might not think they should be concerned about.

Vaccinations

Vaccination in pets (and humans when warranted) is considered highly effective.  Due to the severity of the disease, it is still treated very cautiously when there is a possible exposure.  But there haven't been many cases of definitive rabies vaccine failure.  Your best insurance is to keep your pet vaccinated. The law requires that all unvaccinated pets brought into a veterinary hospital be vaccinated.  That means that technically, if you bring your pet to me and it is unvaccinated or has an expired vaccine and is healthy enough to be vaccinated, I as a veterinarian MUST vaccinate.  I don't have the right to allow you to say no. And this applies to indoor cats and ferrets, too.  ALL mammals can get rabies.  This includes rodents and bats which may enter the home and interact with cats and ferrets.  It is true that rodents are considered excessively low risk, because they are so small that most of the time, if they were attacked by a rabid animal like a raccoon or coyote, they would be killed and therefore never able to infect another.  The state does not usually recommend testing dead mice you find in the house, unless there are extenuating circumstances. No vaccines exist for rabbits, guinea pigs, or other pocket pets.  But if a vaccine exists (dogs, cats, ferrets, and most large animals like horses and cattle) then your pets should be vaccinated. The ramifications of exposure to rabies are severe and fatal if untreated.

Treatment

If an animal or human is exposed to rabies but is treated in a timely fashion, it is considered 100% treatable. Treatment in animals consists usually of a booster vaccination and then some confinement or quarantine period based upon the previous vaccine status of the pet. Treatment in humans is immunoglobulins and a series of post-exposure vaccines.  Those at high risk, like vets and spelunkers (which I mention because I love that word, and also bats live in caves) should have pre-exposure vaccines, which makes post-exposure treatment much easier. But here is the bad part:  if not caught right after exposure and allowed to progress until signs appear, the disease is 99.9% fatal.  Completely Untreatable. There is no cure. Each state reports their rabies cases independently.  In Massachusetts, from 1992 to 2016, approximately 10% of submitted cases have come back positive.  This dipped slightly down to about 5% (the lowest point) from 2011 – 2013.  In 2016, the most common species to be positive were raccoons, skunks, bats, cats, foxes, and woodchucks. The good news is that cases identified in domestic animals are still quite rare, and human cases are even rarer in the US – only 1-3 cases are identified annually.  This is 3 cases too many.  And sadly, those who feel vaccinations cause grave side effects often use the rarity of the disease as a justification for not vaccinating.  The disease is rare BECAUSE we vaccinate.  Vaccination rates must continue to be high or the disease and associated deaths will increase. Fortunately, there may be hope on the horizon. There have only ever been been a total of 3 known people who have ever been successfully treated after signs appeared.  That's not a lot.  But 10 years ago, we would have said that there had never been a successfully treated case.  Prevention is still the best option, and this starts with awareness.  

More reading:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabies https://www.cdc.gov/rabies/ [post_title] => Rabies: what is it and why do we vaccinate? [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => rabies-what-is-it-and-why-do-we-vaccinate [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-10-09 12:43:34 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-10-09 16:43:34 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?p=9396 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9302 [post_author] => 21 [post_date] => 2017-09-19 11:27:04 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-19 15:27:04 [post_content] => Pet social media accounts have been steadily increasing in number, enabling some real distraction and cuteness overload for humans around the world. We can attest as the Ethos Creative Marketing team that these accounts have been proven to lower stress levels, stabilize blood pressure, and reduce tension after a long day. (These statements in no way have been proven or collaborated by a medical professional or the FDA, but we feel as marketers we are the experts when it comes to Instagram health.) Internet animals are a reliable, holistic, anti-stress medication. The wealth of options ranges from funny cat YouTube videos to your neighbor’s dog’s Facebook account. As an added bonus, they come with no side-effects, and do not require a prescription from a doctor. We support the growth of these accounts and want to share our favorites with you. From our perspective, we have selected the following accounts for the personality of the pet that hosts them, as well as their outstanding photography and storytelling. Please also note, we are in no way affiliated with any of these accounts, other than that we follow them and they bring us joy. Enjoy and proceed with caution:  
 

Lauren's Top 5

  FullSizeRender@brianthewirehairedvizsla This wirehaired gentleman hails from England and enjoys swimming, his ball, and playing with fellow wirehaired pups. Brian’s photos are bright and fun, but his videos stand out most when showing off his stubborn and hilarious personality. FullSizeRender-3@jasperthecowdog Jasper’s account is showered with professional level photography and it only helps that Jasper is one of the most photogenic dogs online. This account is for the adventure fan #adventuredogsofinstagram FullSizeRender-2 @louie_adventurecat Cats still dominate the internet and Louie is the most unique feline out there. His account is full of Louie’s kayaking and hiking adventures. He accompanies his humans on leash and really lives up to his Instagram handle. FullSizeRender-1   @ragtimejimmy Jimmy is another wirehaired canine that showcases great photography that tells a story without having to read the status below. It also helps that Jimmy is a handsome boy who is quite comfortable being a model. FullSizeRender-4 @stickypets Sticky Pets is home to multiple pets and even some wildlife photography. Their use of HDR (high dynamic range) photography makes this account stand out.  
 

Sommer's Top 5

  thumbnail_FullSizeRender-2@rafaelmantesso There is a soft spot in my heart for artists and epically well trained, sweet-heart dogs. The story here: Rafael’s girlfriend left him and took all the furniture. Left with nothing but a bare apartment, his dog (Jimmy) and some time on his hands, Rafael built himself a happy online home. Dogs will cure what ails you, is I think the overarching theme here. thumbnail_FullSizeRender@the_blueboys Derpy pittie brothers Darren and Phillip unquestionably rule the roost at their house. They wear silly outfits, they nap, they eat people-food and the content is written from a first-person (dog?) point of view. Darren and Phillip are living the life and they make mine a little brighter with their antics. thumbnail_FullSizeRender-4 @mugidal I love his photography. It’s unique and clever, he very clearly loves his dog to the moon and back and there is no doubt in my mind that the feeling is mutual. I can feel my blood pressure drop when his name pops up in my feed. thumbnail_FullSizeRender-1 @the_little_gsp Confession #1 – I’m a GSP mom. There, it’s out. I have watched little Piper grow up on Instagram and she is just as silly and adorable as my own little girl Jester. I feel like they would be friends. thumbnail_FullSizeRender-3 @otisbarkington Confession #2 – dogs in slouchy hats make me laugh. Otis owns the slouchy hat look. His page is another silly, happy feed the makes me forget my own worries and woes. When the internet can’t cut it, my own girls Jester and Windy are all the medicine I need.  
 

Rachel's Top 5

  thumbnail_Huskiesadventures@huskiesadventures If you’re looking for 3 of the most majestic (and fluffy) huskies out there, then this is the page for you. Zeus, Thunder, & Oakley are truly #huskygoals. Their owner frequently takes them to the most beautiful landscapes for breathtaking shoots. thumbnail_atchoumthecat @atchoumthecat No, this cat didn’t just wake up from a wild nap. Atchoum the Persian kitty has a rare condition called hypertricosis, also known as werewolf syndrome, which causes fast and continual hair growth. I personally can’t get enough of his bowties and mad scientist-like expressions. thumbnail_wallyandmolly @wally_and_molly Although Wally has crossed the rainbow bridge, his siblings Otis and Suki are just as adorable. These two English Angora rabbits are sure to brighten up your day with their crazy haircuts and hoppin’ personalities. Not to mention the captions are pure gold. thumbnail_bengalthor @bengalthor Thor is a gorgeous Bengal Cat that is prettier than most people I know. He captions the pictures that his “servant” takes of him with his own thoughts, and let me tell you he is quite the shrimp-loving ladies’ man. thumbnail_bearcoattonkey @bearcoat_tonkey So. Much. Smoosh. Tonkey the bear-coat Shar Pei (really, I’m convinced she’s actually part teddy bear) is the cutest ball of wrinkles I’ve ever seen. Look at the face. Follow the face. [post_title] => 15 Pet Instagram Accounts You Should Be Following [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 15-pet-instagram-accounts-you-should-be-following [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-19 11:43:52 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-19 15:43:52 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?p=9302 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9245 [post_author] => 21 [post_date] => 2017-08-11 12:47:12 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-08-11 16:47:12 [post_content] => In May 2017, the Wolfeboro Police Department began an investigation into allegations of animal neglect at a suspected puppy mill operating from a mansion in Wolfeboro, NH.Photo 10 Within weeks, police had teamed up with The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) to rescue 84 Great Danes from squalid conditions. Rescuers reported the dogs had swollen eyelids and that the smell of ammonia, feces and raw chicken was overwhelming. Chief Dean Rondeau of the Wolfeboro Police Department said: “I’ve never seen conditions this bad in more than 21 years of law enforcement. Words cannot describe the absolute abhorrent conditions these animals were living in.” News of the deplorable conditions in which these dogs were kept has rocked the community and made national headlines. This story hit us very close to home, and the team at Ethos Veterinary Health, and in particular Port City Veterinary Referral Hospital in Portsmouth, NH joined the rescue effort by providing medical services for the rescued dogs. “Our thanks go to the HSUS and the Wolfeboro Police Department for their decisive, life-saving actions.” Said Kristi Cablay, Hospital Director of Port City Veterinary Referral Hospital, a member of the Ethos Veterinary Health Network. The HSUS reached out to Port City for assistance in treating the dogs with ophthalmologic trauma after they were seized. Ophthalmologists Drs. Nick Cassotis and Alison Clode were honored to be able to provide the care these dogs desperately needed. On June 27th, Dr. Clode examined the dogs and developed a treatment plan for the ones who were in need of surgical intervention. As our team moves forward with treatment, we are hopeful that the dogs will thrive in the care of The HSUS and their rescue partners.   [caption id="attachment_9247" align="aligncenter" width="423"]Photo 2 Drs. Nick Cassotis and Alison Clode preparing for surgery on one of the Great Danes.[/caption]   [caption id="attachment_9248" align="aligncenter" width="422"]Photo 5 “We were honored to be in the position to donate funds and specialty medical care..." -Kristi Cablay, Hospital Director at Port City[/caption]   [caption id="attachment_9251" align="aligncenter" width="418"]Photo 13 We are hopeful that the dogs will thrive in the care of The HSUS and their rescue partners[/caption]   Visit Port City's Facebook page to view the full photo series.   Photos by Megan Cahill Burt AAS, BS (Port City) [post_title] => The Great Rescue- 84 Great Danes Rescued from a Wolfeboro Mansion [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => the-great-rescue-84-great-danes-rescued-from-a-wolfeboro-mansion [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-08-11 13:16:19 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-08-11 17:16:19 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?p=9245 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9084 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2017-08-02 14:07:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-08-02 18:07:09 [post_content] =>

All that we have been

We packed it all away this week; all the old IVG Hospitals files. The process of archiving over a decade of electronic and physical files was bittersweet, as packing always is. It's no different than packing for a big move, or packing up holiday decorations at the end of a holiday season: great, exciting and thrilling, but also kind of sad in a heartwarming way. We hope you'll allow us this one moment to sentimentally recall IVG Hospitals and all that we have been.

Pictures, or it didn't happen!

I mentioned that we got sentimental. Did I mention that we took pictures? Of course we did. Here they are, these are a few of our favorite finds as we dug through the files. The images chronicle the efforts of every staff member whether doctor, technician, client care coordinator, service center operator or member of the administrative team.

Housekeeping note:

We can't afford the rights to the music, but as you go through this, the vibe is more American Author's "Best Day of my Life", less Sarah McLaughlin's "Angel". (thank you ;) )

Here we go

Let's jump in shall we? Have you met me? Maybe, maybe not, I am Sommer Aweidah and I am the defender of the brand, though they haven't given me that exact title. I love this place. I love that every team is unique and I work to make those voices sing in harmony through our marketing materials and our online presence. This was our brand; these were our colors; this was our face to the external world. sommer_collateral Behind the face of IVG Hospitals, there is and always has been real substance, and that is what provoked the feelings of sentimentality. I am excited about the new Ethos Veterinary Health brand. I can't wait to watch it grow, because I know that safe at its core is the substance that made the IVG brand what it was. The secret to our success is our incredible team. At the core of all that we are, and all that we are about to become, is our team of doctors, technicians, client care coordinators, client care liaisons and our administrative teams.  It is the compassion, the care, the willingness and flexibility to find a solution. It's about relationships, (I find most things are), and the dedication towards building them with our clients, patients, referring veterinarians, suppliers and co-workers. We would not be where we are today if not for every member of our team. Thank you! And thank you in advance for the next ten years, because everything that has come before and everything yet to come is a team effort. Speaking on behalf of the entire administrative team,  (some of whom generously agreed to be photographed here), we want to thank all the doctors, technicians, client care coordinators, service center liaisons and everyone in between for always being available to answer our questions, emails, and for their willingness to smile for, focus on, or ignore the camera when we point it at their faces. Speaking of pointing cameras at people's faces... pictures were promised, here they are: [playlist type="video" tracklist="false" ids="9202"]  

Thank you

It's been quite a ride, these last 38 years since Dr. John Prentiss bought Bulger Animal Hospital in North Andover from Dr. Bulger. We picked the people in the pictures for a couple of reasons: Here's to all that we have been, all that we are, and all we will become! [post_title] => Past, Present and Future [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => past-present-and-future [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-10-09 12:44:01 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-10-09 16:44:01 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?p=9084 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9103 [post_author] => 18 [post_date] => 2017-07-24 15:50:55 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-07-24 19:50:55 [post_content] => Clients often ask what it’s like to be a vet. The general perception based on comments I’ve heard is that we “get to play with puppies and kittens all day!” While I do get to interact with dogs, cats, and the occasional ferret, guinea pig, or other small mammal, nothing I do would be described as “play.”  The patients I treat are generally somewhat on edge, and not overly happy to see me. More of what I do is interact with owners, develop diagnostic plans, interpret findings, figure out finances for what we need to do, talk on the phone, write up records, mediate disputes with clients, help with ordering hospital supplies, troubleshoot equipment, perform surgery and other procedures, and occasionally take a break to eat or use the restroom. [caption id="attachment_9124" align="aligncenter" width="300"]GP_edited Dr. Vernaleken doing what she loves most: treating patients.[/caption]   So, since you asked, here is a snapshot of my life as a general practice vet on a typical day of appointments:

The following story is based on true events. Only the patient names and breeds have been changed to protect their identities.

1:00 PM, A Head Start 

On a typical appointment day, I arrive anywhere from 30 to 60 minutes before my appointments begin.  In this time, I usually do the following: Today, I’m in appointments from 2–8 PM, so I arrived around 1 PM.  Appointments are scheduled for 20-30 minutes – shorter for well-appointments, longer for sick or more complicated cases.

A Healthy, Happy Lab

13391426_938126049638471_8884950167642241549_o1:45 PM:  My first patient, a young adult Labrador Retriever, arrives. Even though I still have a few minutes before I “start,” I ask my technician to bring them into a room.  You never know what will happen later, so getting a head start on the day is always helpful. My team of technicians, client care coordinators and customer service liaisons are invaluable. So much of what I do is made easier, better and smoother because of their (sometimes seemingly invisible) support, and I cannot thank them enough. My technician has taken a brief history on the dog and brings back the file for me to review.  It’s a healthy pet, but has had a few mild problems (an ear infection, diarrhea once).  We determine the pet needs a physical exam, a few vaccines, and a heartworm test. I talk to the owner more in-depth about the pet’s history, what preventatives they use, any concerns they have, and what their goals are for their dog. I examine the dog nose-to-tail to make sure there aren’t any detectable problems (there aren't), and that the dog is healthy enough to receive vaccinations today (he is).  We draw blood for the heartworm test, give the vaccines, and then review the dog’s plan for the next year (e.g. continue monthly heartworm preventatives and flea & tick preventatives). Finally, I answer questions from the owner about flea & tick prevention options and we escort them out front. They get everything they need and head out, probably for a day of Labrador Retriever fun.

A Scared-y Cat

2:10 PM:  The next appointment (a cat for her annual visit) is here, so my technician brings them into a room while I complete the medical record for the last appointment, which must include: The technician comes back and tells me that the cat I’m seeing is extremely angry and won’t come out of the carrier. We gather some supplies (towels, thick gloves) and go back into the room together. The cat is just scared and we are as careful, quiet, and non-threatening as we can be while we protect ourselves from sharp teeth and claws.  We carefully examine the cat, administer vaccines, and trim the cat’s nails (which is no easy feat, but we’re the experts and we try to help the owner).  No one is hurt and the owner and displeased cat are sent home with everyone intact.

A Scooting Pooch IMG_0055

2:45 PM:  My next patient arrived 5 minutes late.  No problem – we do the same as for the first patient The client states that the dog is “scooting” and needs his nails trimmed, so we bring him back to express his anal sacs (avoiding getting this nasty discharge on ourselves so we won’t stink for the whole day) and trim his nails. He goes back to the owner, who checks out while I write up this record, and while my technician brings in my next client.

An Itchy Shih TzuIMG_0904

3:05 PM: Despite my best efforts, I’m 5 minutes late getting into this appointment.  This is a “check eye” appointment for a sweet 12-year-old Shih Tzu, but it’s not just the eyes. The owners have concerns with the dog’s ears, teeth, itchiness, chronic vomiting, and behavior. I have 25 minutes to carefully review every concern: We do three tests on the eyes, bloodwork to clear him for anesthesia for a dental cleaning as well as to figure out if there is a reason for the vomiting, a test for the ears to see if we have an infection, discuss but don’t perform x-rays for the vomiting, and briefly review their behavioral concerns but ultimately explain that we need to fix the medical problems first and most likely don’t have time to deeply review behavior today. We send the dog home with: This has taken me 35 minutes, so I’m now running 10 minutes late.  Although I took notes so that I wouldn't forget anything, I need to write up everything in detail and I can't leave until every record has been completed. I set aside this record to complete later since I don’t have time to write it now.

A Toothy Problem

3:40 PM:  We go into my next appointment; a big, handsome cat is here for a tooth check. We examine the cat, discuss anesthesia, draw pre-anesthetic bloodwork, discuss dental disease and the likely need for two extractions. Meanwhile, the client from the 3:00 Shih Tzu appointment calls in. The husband brought the dog in, and the wife couldn’t be there but wants me to review the appointment with her in detail. I let my receptionist know that I’ll have to call them back. I write up the record for my current appointment while two of my technicians get the bloodwork, write up an estimate, and bring the cat and estimate out to the owner. We review it and the owners let me know that they aren’t sure they can afford it. We discuss financial options and my medical opinion on the need for this procedure.  The owner will schedule it when they can afford it.

Nervous Nellie

4:05 PM: Two-dog appointment for routine wellness with two nervous little Chihuahuas. Chihuahuas are often nervous, though, so this isn't out of the ordinary. Unfortunately, we do have to muzzle one of them and the other is shaking in his boots during the entire appointment.  Nevertheless, we get through our full exam: I wrote up one patient record during the appointment and bring back the second patient’s record to finish before the next appointment. I still have the Shih Tzu appointment to write up, and need to call that client back but both will have to wait as my next appointment is in the room.

Puppy BreathDaveSchmidt

4:40 PM: I’m back on schedule, and this appointment is an adorable puppy. All puppies are cute, but this little Golden girl is particularly cute. We review: Housetraining We examine the puppy for general health as well as any congenital problems (problems he was born with) and find out he’s perfectly healthy! We finish up and give the owner a “new puppy” packet with a heartworm pill, flea & tick prevention, and insurance information, and set them up for their next booster vaccine appointment. I have time to complete the record for this one but still haven’t had time to complete the Shih Tzu’s record, I always take notes during appointments so that if I can’t do the write-up immediately, I don’t forget the details, and I never go home until all my records from the day have been completed. While I’m in this appointment, the Shih Tzu’s owner also calls back because they haven’t heard from me yet. I let my receptionist know that I’m not able to call back right now and might not be able to until the end of my appointments at 8 PM.

A Clogged CatHeatherKridel

5:10 PM:  The next appointment, a cat who is not defecating (pooping), arrives on time and is brought into a room by my technician. After discussing the cat’s history with the owner (she hasn’t defecated in a week and a half).I examine her and find her colon packed full of hard feces.  She’s severely constipated, and without intervention there is no way she’s going to be able to pass it all. I review the situation with the owner. We will need to: This is certainly a costly route but it’s really the only option, and the owner reluctantly agrees. I let the owner know that we’ll be running the tests as soon as we can and that we’ll get her kitty on fluids right away. I won’t be able to do the poop removal until after appointments end, but I’ll call her after that to review the procedure. Most likely the cat will be able to go home tomorrow after she’s recuperated from anesthesia and gotten started on some medications. The owner agrees, signs everything she needs to sign, and we get started with the cat. I work with the technician to draw blood and place the IV catheter, then she is taken for x-rays while I write up a treatment sheet so she can be started on her fluids.

Three’s Company: A Trio of Dogs 4 Collies

My 5:40, 6:00, and 6:20 appointments are all the same family – three dogs.  While it may seem easier to schedule multiple pets together, it can be challenging for both the owner and my team to focus on each individual dog. We talk about each dog’s personal history, examine them, and make sure that they each receive the correct vaccinations and heartworm tests. Each dog also has individual issues to be discussed: Because this was a very involved appointment, I wasn’t able to complete their records during the exam. We finish up, give the client their products, and I go back to review the constipated cat’s bloodwork, x-rays and make sure she’s settled in on fluids. I also take this opportunity to calculate and draw up anesthesia drugs. Coincidentally, this owner calls while I’m doing this because she’s having second thoughts about the procedure and the cost. I talk with her about the treatment plan, procedure and outcome again, and she again affirms that she’s back on board and gives us the go ahead to proceed with the treatment.

BorderCollieItchy Ears

6:55 PM:  My 6:40 PM appointment arrives 15 minutes late. Fortunately, I have used this time to work on the constipated cat and one of the records I’m behind on. Unfortunately, I have two more appointments and the next one is due to arrive at 7 PM. We offer the client who was late (patient A’s owner), two options: keep the appointment, but with the understanding that it will be interrupted when my next appointment arrives, or rescheduling the appointment. She chooses to keep the appointment. As soon as we begin, my 7 PM arrives and is brought into a room. Both pets have ear infections. My technician collects an ear swab sample from patient A while I talk with the 7 PM appointment (patient B’s owner), and collect the ear swab. I go back and look at patient A’s ear swab while my tech stains patient B’s ear swab. I’m careful to keep each pet’s records and results separate. Strangely, their ears are nearly identical. I go in and talk to patient A’s owner, clean the dog’s ears, apply the treatment, escort them out front, and then circle back to patient B and have the same talk, clean out those ears, and apply the treatment. Both appointments are done by 7:30 PM, but I add those records to the stack I still need to finish.

Another Wiggly Puppy13465934_10207808431301684_6311239592658479488_n

7:30 PM: My last appointment of the day is another puppy. I love seeing new puppies and always try my best to be as enthusiastic and educational as I have been with my other clients. We talk about all the puppy stuff and have a fairly lengthy discussion about housetraining.  We send this owner home with the same packet of “new puppy” items.

Back to the Clogged Cat

8:00 PM: I have a stack of seven files to complete, an owner to call back, and the poop removal to perform. I give the poop cat her sedation injection with a technician’s help, and while the tech sets up the equipment for the procedure, I call back the Shih Tzu’s owner. We review everything that I had gone over with her husband and discuss in depth our plan and each medication. I also call an owner whose pet’s bloodwork is back from the day before with an update. In the meantime, my technicians are also approving medication refills, calling owners who have more routine questions, and cleaning up the exam rooms. By now, it’s 8:20 PM and the cat is ready for anesthesia 8:30 PM: The cat is fully under anesthesia with fluids running, monitoring equipment attached, and we’re ready to go. I spend the next 30 minutes painstakingly pulling hard feces out of her colon until I think we’re empty. We take an x-ray and see that it’s not all out. I go back in for another 15 minutes and take another x-ray confirming that her colon is empty. The entire hospital smells like 2-week-old cat feces, and the whole team blames me (all in good fun) for stinking up the hospital. Fortunately, I double-gloved because I’ve learned that if you only single-glove, you’ll smell that cat poop on your hands for 2 days no matter how many times you wash. I stay with the cat and technician until she’s recovered enough that we’re comfortable with me walking away. She goes back to her kennel on fluids and continues to recover from anesthesia.

Wrapping Up: Calls & Paperwork

9:15 PM: I check my voicemail again; there are three more messages that were left during the afternoon while I was in appointments. It’s not too late, so I call them back – one is a question about weight loss recommendations in cats, one is about whether it’s time to put a dog to sleep, and one is a dental question. I return those calls and then call up the constipated cat’s owner to let her know that her cat is doing well and we were successful in removing all the feces. We review the long-term care this cat will need (diet modification, laxatives, and maybe someday surgery if we can’t keep this under control). 9:45 PM: With all my phone calls and patient care responsibilities done, I sit down to write up my records. I finish these up in about 20 minutes and write up the discharge instructions for the constipated cat, and make sure all the charges are accurate. 10:15 PM: Time to go home. This is a long and what seems like fairly crazy evening, but it is pretty representative of what all veterinarians and technicians do at a busy hospital on a daily basis.  At the end of the day, I have: I have not eaten dinner, and I have had about 2 cups of coffee (although I made about 4 cups, many of which got cold when I didn’t get to drink them). Vets love our chosen profession – all that we ask is that our clients understand that frequently, we have a million other things going on at one time and need your patience. During this day, It can be exhausting, but we have to be as emotionally available, friendly, and medically on-the-ball with the last client as we are with the first. Vets often do have the best job in the world, just not always for the reasons the general public thinks.  We certainly get to have so much more contact with animals on a daily basis than anyone else.  We also have an engaging and exciting time being the experts in pet care, advising clients about preventative care, and puzzling through the challenge of diagnosing problems. The downside can be that very occasionally, we are not treated well by clients who accuse us of being "only in it for the money."  This hurts more than you may know, since we care very deeply and are not as well compensated as other similar professions (who might not ever once have to pull poop out of a cat's rear end). I love what I do, as do my colleagues and team. My hope is that anyone reading this far can now appreciate that practicing "routine" medicine is far from routine.   12:00 AM - Time for bed: goodnight.   

 Related Links

Cleaning Your Dog's Ears Clipping Your Dog's Nails [post_title] => A Day in the Life: General Practice Veterinarian [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => a-day-in-the-life-general-practice-veterinarian [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-27 20:10:42 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-28 00:10:42 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?p=9103 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8859 [post_author] => 18 [post_date] => 2017-07-13 14:29:07 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-07-13 18:29:07 [post_content] =>

Introducing Our New Name

In December 2015, IVG Hospitals joined three other specialty and emergency hospital groups across the country to form a new organization named Ethos Veterinary Health.  As we move forward with rebranding, we are pleased to announce the next step in our transformation: new logos and one new hospital name. We have renamed IVG MetroWest to better reflect the brand identity of the Ethos network and the services our team provides. IVG MetroWest will now be known as Boston West Veterinary Emergency and Specialty.

Boston West Veterinary Emergency and Specialty - formerly IVG MetroWest

Our Sister Hospital Logos

Ethos Veterinary Health hospitals are located in 7 different states across the U.S. The brand rollout will eventually go from "sea to shining sea," but until then, here is a look at all the logos of our hospitals in the northeast. logos of the Ethos Veterinary Health hospitals in the north east As we rebrand, our materials will start to look a little different, but it is still the same teams committed to providing superior service to you and your family. We are thrilled to be able to reposition the hospital for future growth and to continue to build on our role as a partner in the greater Boston pet owner community.

Our Social Media Channels:

In addition to our new look and name, we're updating our social media accounts. Please follow us on our new pages on Instagram and Twitter. Facebook will remain the same.

Instagram: @ethosvethealth

Twitter: @ethosvethealth

We appreciate your trust in our team and look forward to continuing to provide you with exceptional quality and superior service. [post_title] => IVG MetroWest Has a New Name! [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => ivg-metrowest-has-a-new-name [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-13 14:29:07 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-13 18:29:07 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?p=8859 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8865 [post_author] => 21 [post_date] => 2017-07-11 11:10:46 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-07-11 15:10:46 [post_content] => Summer is here in the Northeast which means getting outside and enjoying the weather. You have your own list of things to do and places to see, but what about your beloved pooch who watches you leave every Saturday as you head out for your weekend outing? Well, it's time to grab that leash and make some memories. Let’s just say if your dog had a bucket list, this is what it would look like. Whether you’re looking for trails, parks, or pet-friendly restaurants and activities, there's something for you and your dog. Here’s a quick shortlist to get your adventures started, and some helpful tips for your travels.  

Massachusetts - North Shore (near Mass Vet Referral & Bulger Veterinary Hospital)

A Day in Salem
Salem, MA
Salem is one of the most dog-friendly towns around the North Shore. Start off your day in the famous Witch City by grabbing some homemade treats and toys at one of many (super cute) local pet shops downtown. Then, hop on the dog-friendly Salem Trolley or Salem Historical Tours, stop by the Salem Dog Park, or stroll through Salem Willows Park along the coast. Or take your canine companion with you when you… grab a bite to eat outside at any of these dog-friendly Salem restaurants:  
Black Rock Beach, AKA Dog Beach
Nahant, MA
This one is a local secret. Reportedly, it is a dog-friendly beach even through the summer months which is almost unheard of around here. Go for a swim, play a game of fetch in the sand, and enjoy the salty air and brisk waters of the North Shore on this beautiful and spacious beach. Just remember to be respectful and clean up after your dog so that we can continue to enjoy it! If beaches aren't your thing… stop by Flash Road Park in Nahant to enjoy wide, grassy spaces for your dog to run around.    
Lynn Woods
Lynn, MA
With over 30 miles of scenic trail, Lynn Woods is the second largest municipal park in the whole country! Take your pup on a nature-filled hike by the reservoirs and enjoy historic sites like Dungeon Rock, the Rose Garden, and the Amphitheater. For all you gamers out there, the area around Burrill Stone Tower is a notorious battleground in ‘Fallout 4’. Don’t worry though, you won’t have to fight deathclaws or supermutants to get to the real tower.  Not up for a hike today? Head over to... the always-active Dogland Ave Dog Park where you and your dog are guaranteed to make new friends.  
     
Stage Fort Park
Gloucester, MA
Stage Fort is the historic site of Gloucester’s first settlers in the 1600s. Today, it features beautiful trails along the coast, a baseball field, cooking areas, picnic benches, and even a seasonal restaurant. Between Half Moon Beach and the rocky pathways by the ocean, it’s a fun seaside park worth wandering with your pooch! And you guessed it, there’s a dog park here too. And later… Grab a bite to eat outside at any of these dog-friendly Gloucester restaurants:      

Massachusetts - Metro West (near Boston West Veterinary Emergency and Specialty)

Hopkinton State Park
Hopkinton, MA
Running through Hopkinton and Ashland, this state park is where summer adventures begin. With numerous outdoor options to enjoy such as hiking, kayaking, boating, fishing, picnicking, and swimming you and your pup have plenty of choices for how to spend your day. Walk along the picturesque Hopkinton Reservoir, play fetch in the water off the boat launches, or share a relaxing picnic with your furry pal. But beware, the park fills up quickly on hot summer days so plan ahead! Too hot for a hike? You can… rent a kayak, pedal boat, sail boat, or canoe at Boating in Boston (inside the state park) with your dog. Canine life jackets are available!    
Cat Rock Park
Weston, MA
This is a wonderful off-leash opportunity for your dog. An easy walk up wooded trails leads to a beautiful pond and massive field. The best part is there's no leash requirement, so Fido can roam freely up the trails, jump in the pond for a swim, and frolic with other dogs in the meadow. On weekends when dogs and owners congregate, it's basically a giant unfenced dog park. Fun for everyone! Then fill your tummies with... some ice cream, hotdogs, and burgers at the dog-friendly Dairy Joy up the street.      
Blue Hills Reservation
Milton, MA
Just outside of Boston, this green oasis stretches through Quincy, Braintree, Canton, Dedham, Milton, and Randolph. If you and your dog are up for a good hike to Skyline Trail, you’ll reach the summit of Great Blue Hill overlooks the entire metropolitan area. You can also explore the diverse ecosystems of marshes, swamps, meadows, and bogs. And later… Just up the highway you can stop by these dog-friendly South Shore restaurants:  
 

New Hampshire - Western Region (near SAVES)

Northern Rail Trail
Lebanon, NH
This 48-mile long rail-trail is the largest of its kind in New Hampshire. The trailhead in downtown Lebanon quickly transitions from a walk in the city to a stroll through nature. At this end, it follows the scenic Mascoma River and even crosses over it a few times. If you and your athletic pooch are up for a long trek, Mascoma Lake is 4 miles out from the trailhead. Once you reach it, you are handsomely rewarded with a mile of lakeshore walking and spectacular views. If you're hungry… grab a bite to eat outside at one of these dog-friendly Lebanon restaurants:  
Shaker Field Dog Park
Enfield, NH
Built just a couple years ago, Shaker Field Dog Park is one for the books. It is free and open to the public and features multiple fenced-in areas with benches, tunnels, dirt piles, and tires. Not to mention lots and LOTS of grass for open running space. You can even work on Fido’s mad skills in the training area. Friendly owners, friendly dogs, and lots of playtime…trust me, your dog will thank you later.  And later… Just up the highway you can stop by one of these dog-friendly restaurants in Hanover:      

New Hampshire - The Seacoast (near Port City Veterinary Referral Hospital)

Peirce Island
Portsmouth, NH
Locals rave about Peirce Island, and understandably so! It is a gorgeous off-leash opportunity for your dog that stretches along the coast. Short, shady trails lead to picturesque views of the navy yard and Piscataqua bridges that are perfect for boat watching and picnicking. Sadly, most of the island including the off-leash area is currently closed for construction but keep it in the back of your mind for the future! For now… head over to the South Mill Pond Dog Park for some playtime by the water or learn about Portsmouth's history on a dog-friendly guided walking tour. Then grab a bite to eat outside at one of these dog-friendly Portsmouth restaurants:  
Mount Agamenticus
York, ME
Just a 15 minute drive up I-95 from Portsmouth brings you to another New England gem. This relatively small coastal mountain offers many trails which take you to the summit, including the Big A, Fisher Trail, and Blueberry Bluff among six others. Most of them are under a mile long and lead to incredible views showcasing the ocean and the White Mountains. You can even drive up if you and your pup aren’t up for the hike. Go for the hike (or ride) and stay for the view. Alternatively… Enjoy a sunset on the beach on Long Sands Beach or Short Sands Beach both in York. Dogs are welcome on-leash after 6 PM in the summer!        

A Little Further North…

Diana’s Baths
Bartlett, NH
Diana’s Baths are further up north, but I just had to include it. For anyone on vacation in the White Mountains or looking for a day trip, it is simply a must-see. The trail is a fairly easy walk that leads to the pools, cascades, slides, and small plunges of Lucy Brook. Along with being breathtakingly-beautiful, you and your dog can truly experience the waterfalls by jumping in yourselves! Be sure to bring your bathing suit because you can relax in the warm swimming holes, slide down the natural “waterslides,” or sunbathe on the rocks surrounded by water. It gets busy on hot days, but there are plenty of levels to climb up until you find the perfect spot for you and your pooch to splash around. After you've both dried off… Up the road you can grab a bite to eat outside at one of these dog-friendly North Conway restaurants:    

New York - Albany area (near Capital District Veterinary Referral Hospital)

Zim Smith Mid-County Trail
Saratoga County, NY
Just north of Latham, the Zim Smith Trail is considered the backbone of a network of trails in its county. It is recommended to start at Shenantaha Creek Park in Malta, where you and your dog can enjoy the park before setting out on your walk. Once you head out, it is an easy paved stroll with views of a ravine and lots of woods. Further up you will pass neighborhoods with horse pastures and if you go far enough, you may even reach the quaint little town of Round Lake Village. Looking for an urban adventure instead? Then… head a little further north to Saratoga Springs and explore these dog-friendly places downtown:  
Mohawk-Hudson Bike-Hike Trail
Latham, NY
This 35-mile trail extends all the way from Albany to Little Falls. It is an easy paved hike perfect for an easygoing casual walk or run. It is quite popular among bikers, walkers, and joggers and passes by numerous lakes, rivers, towns, and other landscape that is sure to make for a pleasant change of scenery for you and your dog. Alternatively… There’s plenty of dog-friendly restaurants and parks in the surrounding towns of Troy, Albany, and Schenectady:    

Tips For Your Travels:

Flea & Tick Prevention
It is a particularly heavy tick year around the Northeast, so make sure you stay on top of giving your dog oral or topical flea and tick medication before taking them out. Also be sure to check them for ticks in between their toes, ears, armpits, neck, and tails and brush your fingers through their fur after each and every excursion.
The Right Trail For You, and Your Dog
Do your research before setting out on a hike. If you and/or your dog have exercise or mobility restraints, pick an activity that is right for both of you. Most of the trails I mentioned are easy to moderate, but always remember to pace yourself.
Break Time
It can be a long, hot day of walking when you’re out with your dog, so don’t forget to stop for breaks and pack some extra water bottles, hiking snacks, and bowls. There are lots of inexpensive options for portable water bowls and treats that are easy to pack and carry with you.
Stay on the Path
It can be tempting to venture off the trail and explore the road less traveled by, but it’s not the best idea for your pooch. Dangers like poison ivy, ticks, snakes, porcupines, and even bears can threaten you and your pet, so stay on track!
Bring Poop Bags
This one is pretty self-explanatory. Please pick up after your dog and don’t leave waste in parks, streets, or trails!
Tags
Make sure your dog has an up to date tag on his or her collar. It’s probably ideal to list a cell phone number on your dog’s tag rather than a home phone number, this way if your dog does get separated and a good Samaritan finds him or her, they can reach you quickly on your cell. We encourage microchipping too, as collars and dogs often get separated, but that’s a different article, for another time.
Doggie First-Aid Kit
Making and bringing a first-aid kit is a good precaution to consider. You should pack veterinary phone numbers, bandages, gauze, scissors, tweezers, sports tape, rubber gloves, Q-tips, a flashlight, and an extra leash. For more information on pet first aid kits, and a checklist of items, click here. And of course we’re always here 24/7 if you need us!  

Have fun!

[post_title] => These Are the Places You Must Bring Your Dog This Summer [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => these-are-the-places-you-must-bring-your-dog-this-summer [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-25 12:03:25 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-25 16:03:25 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?p=8865 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8731 [post_author] => 21 [post_date] => 2017-06-27 09:15:43 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-06-27 13:15:43 [post_content] => It’s that time of year again! With the warm weather making a comeback to the Northeast, more people are looking for a new companion with whom they’ll share their summers (and beyond). Not so fast though, because there are some things everyone should know before taking the leap. In my years of volunteering with animal shelters, working in various veterinary settings, and adopting a few rescue pets myself, I’ve learned some critical things about rescue pets. Be prepared, some of these may be shocking.  

1. Limited Options

First, I must address the limited options there are in rescue pets. Turns out, there really is no limit to the available options and you can basically find whatever you want out there. Purebred, couch potato, hiking buddy, 8 weeks old or 8 years old, you name it and you can probably find a rescue animal that fits your exact lifestyle and preferences. This is because there's typically more behavioral and health information available from rescues and organizations than there is on a pet from a breeder or pet store. Along with that, millions of animals of all shapes, sizes, ages, and species enter shelters and rescues every year, so you have plenty to choose from. Variety and abundance? You can be as picky as you want! [caption id="attachment_8735" align="aligncenter" width="334"]Christine with Talulah (blonde) and Roscoe (the little guy), adopted from Forever Home Rescue New England and MSPCA Nevin’s Farm. “Talulah is very smart, lovable and sweet as pie! Roscoe is fun, rambunctious and an excellent cuddler! Christine with Talulah (blonde) and Roscoe (the little guy), adopted from Forever Home Rescue New England and MSPCA Nevin’s Farm. “Talulah is very smart, lovable and sweet as pie! Roscoe is fun, rambunctious and an excellent cuddler!"[/caption]

 

2. Not an Easy Search

Once you decide what you want, it's not easy to find a local shelter or rescue; it's very easy. You can start looking on websites like Petfinder and Adopt a Pet where you can run a customized search for adoptable animals near you from the comfort of your own home. So for those of you who were hoping to search far and wide for that special pet, sorry to disappoint. There is such a vast number of shelters and rescues in this particular area and each offers something different. Looking for a certain breed? Rescues like the Yankee Golden Retriever Rescue and the Patriot Siberian Husky Rescue offer specific breeds of all ages. Looking for the "shopping” experience? The Northeast Animal Shelter is a no-kill shelter with 5+ rooms full of kennels and cages. Want a more relaxed setting? Great Dog Rescue New England offers home visits to dogs being fostered. Not a cat or dog person? Animal Rescue League of Boston and MSPCA at Nevins Farm have you covered with everything from small and furry, to flying and feathered, to hooved or horned. Better yet, all of these organizations will work with you to match you with the perfect fit for your needs. You can’t go wrong! Okay, they win this round. [caption id="attachment_8732" align="aligncenter" width="320"]Sommer and Pete with Jester, adopted through Great Dog Rescue New England. “Her hobbies include swimming, going for long hikes in the woods, going for runs with the mountain bike crew, cuddling, and getting treats.” Sommer and Pete with Jester, adopted through Great Dog Rescue New England. “Her hobbies include swimming, going for long hikes in the woods, going for runs with the mountain bike crew, cuddling, and getting treats.”[/caption]

 

3. Outrageous Price

I can't explain to you how much money you will save by adopting a pet from a shelter or rescue. Adoption fees are generally much lower than buying from a breeder or pet store. While adoption fees normally range from $25-$700, buying a pet can cost $1,000+. Rescue pets are also usually already vaccinated, microchipped, spayed/neutered, dewormed, and tested for heartworm and intestinal parasites. Some shelters even provide certificates for discounted exams and spay/neuter procedures at local veterinary hospitals. Basically, they want to give you a healthy pet for a reasonable price. Forget about that little weekend trip you were thinking about, you're going to have to plan an entire tropical getaway with all that saved money. What a hassle. [caption id="attachment_8746" align="aligncenter" width="429"] Jordan with Zara (back) and Giuseppe, both private rescues. “Giuseppe, like me, is such a sweet and sour patch! Zara has truly made me a better person in all ways, he truly is my angel.”[/caption]    

4. Good Luck Trying to Train Them

Don't get me started on how well-behaved most of the adult pets already are. House-trained? Done. Sit? Stay? Easy. Good with other animals or kids? Already evaluated. This is because many rescue pets have already spent time in a home or have been socialized in some way. Many pets are surrendered to shelters because the owner was facing financial or personal issues that didn’t allow them to continue care. Some rescue organizations also have foster homes that pets stay at while they wait for their forever homes, and shelters have teams of awesome staff and volunteers who spend lots of time with the animals. Think of it this way: adult rescue animals are like seasoned pets that have been there, done that. Some shelters even have certified trainers and volunteers that work with the animals to ensure that each and every one is ready for a new home. Sorry, new pet owner, but you're just going to have to deal with a well-trained animal. But, if you're still looking to put your carpets through the grueling process of house-training, puppies are plentiful throughout shelters and rescues. Phew! At least we still have that. [caption id="attachment_8827" align="aligncenter" width="368"]Brianna with Laney, adopted from MSPCA Nevin’s Farm. “Laney was an unexpected surprise that we didn't know we needed.” Brianna with Laney, adopted from MSPCA Nevin’s Farm. “Laney was an unexpected surprise that we didn't know we needed.”[/caption]    

5. You Get Labeled

Yeah, that’s right. By adopting a pet, you inevitably become a responsible animal humanitarian. When you adopt, you are not only saving the life of that pet, but that of another that can now take its place. Did you know there are over 70 million homeless pets in the U.S. alone? This outnumbers homeless people 5 to 1. Furthermore, many people are still not aware of the cruel nature of puppy mills which supply pet stores with over 2 million puppies every year. With that kind of volume, many of these puppies don’t even get sold and end up getting dropped off at shelters, adding to the countless animals that are surrendered, abandoned, and picked up off the street. Many people also don’t know about the cruel nature of the exotic animal trade. These animals, primarily reptiles, amphibians, and rodents, often endure miserable living conditions while they are bred and shipped to major pet stores across the country. If you instead adopt from a rescue, you would be supporting the fight against immoral breeding practices and homeless animals all at once. Heck, you may even help shut down a few puppy mills and inhumane breeders along the way. Unfortunately, that’s just the type of person you are now. [caption id="attachment_8743" align="aligncenter" width="344"]Jodi with Goomba, rescued and rehabbed after an accident. “The most resilient, goofy, sensitive little creature I have ever met.” Jodi with Goomba, rescued and rehabbed after an accident. “The most resilient, goofy, sensitive little creature I have ever met.”[/caption]    

6. Gruesome Side Effects

I saved the best (or worst) for last. For many rescue animals, all they have seen in their lives so far is neglect, abuse, terror, and learning to live on their own. They have every reason not to trust humans, but for some remarkable reason they learn how to love. And boy do they! So be ready when you bring one home. Say goodbye to things like personal space, loneliness, and even anxiety. You may also experience the following horrors: extreme face licking, intense cuddling, cute noise making, food begging, and constant following around your house. *Shudders* And if you think that’s bad just wait for what will happen to YOU. You could be happier, feel physically and/or mentally healthier, smile more, learn new things, and you may even develop excessive baby talk tendencies. A rescue pet will force you to realize what’s important in life and load you with adventures and memories for many years to come. Sometimes they may pretend like they don’t hear you calling their name and occasionally steal food off your plate, but they will always (eventually) put that smile back on your face. Whether they’re furry, feathered, or covered in scales you will be their hero and they will love you unconditionally. No pressure, though. [caption id="attachment_8745" align="aligncenter" width="444"]Lauren with Luka, adopted from Dixie Pet Underground Railroad in Tennessee. “I am so lucky he chose me.” Lauren with Luka, adopted from Dixie Pet Underground Railroad in Tennessee. “I am so lucky he chose me.”[/caption]   [caption id="attachment_8737" align="aligncenter" width="415"]Amanda with Manny, a private rescue. “The best first dog anyone could have asked for, plus he has beaten cancer with his happy-go lucky attitude.” Amanda with Manny, a private rescue. “The best first dog anyone could have asked for, plus he has beaten cancer and kept his happy-go lucky attitude.”[/caption]   Well there you have it. Are you sure you're ready for these horrible consequences? On a serious note, please consider adopting when looking for a new companion. But if adopting isn’t for you, please be a responsible and informed shopper. Choose a certified, credible breeder and do your research to find out which pet and breed is right for you and your family. Below is a list of some paws-itively amazing rescues and shelters near our Ethos hospitals in the east (not even a slightly complete list, do your research, the choices are endless. Sorry about that!).

National/Online:

Petfinder Adopt a Pet

Massachusetts:

New England All Breed Rescue Leicester, MA (dogs only) PALS Animal Lifesavers Salem, MA (cats only) Worcester Animal Rescue League Worcester, MA (dogs, cats, small & furry) The Gecko Sanctuary Holbrook, MA (reptiles only) German Shepherd Rescue League of New England Wayland, MA (German Shepherd dogs only) Forever Home Rescue New England Medfield, MA (dogs only) Yankee Golden Retriever Rescue Hudson, MA (Golden Retriever dogs only) Patriot Siberian Husky Rescue shelterless, contact organization for details (Siberian Husky dogs only) Great Dog Rescue New England shelterless/foster-based, contact organization for details (dogs only) Animal Rescue League of Boston Boston, MA (dogs, cats, small & furry, birds) MSPCA at Nevins Farm Methuen, MA (dogs, cats, small & furry, birds, & barnyard) Northeast Animal Shelter Salem, MA (dogs & cats)

Southern/Central New Hampshire:

Animal Rescue League of New Hampshire Bedford, NH (dogs, cats, small & furry) New Hampshire SPCA Stratham, NH (dogs, cats, small & furry, birds, & barnyard) Northeastern Reptile Welfare League North Haverhill, NH (reptiles only) Manchester Animal Shelter Manchester, NH (dogs, cats, small & furry) Upper Valley Humane Society Enfield, NH (dogs, cats, & rabbits)  

Capital District, New York:

Noah’s Kingdom Humane Society Albany, NY (cats only) Mohawk Hudson Humane Society Menands, NY (dogs, cats, small & furry, & birds) Homeward Bound Dog Rescue of New York Schenectady, NY (dogs only)  

Rachael is the summer marketing intern for Ethos East. She is entering her final year as a business undergraduate student at Salem State University with a major in marketing and minor in economics. Animals are truly her passion and she has worked in client care at a veterinary hospital and volunteered at animal shelters around the North Shore. She has 3 rescue pets of her own and they are the loves of her life. 

[caption id="attachment_8811" align="aligncenter" width="297"]Rachael with Brady, Lily, and Floyd all adopted from the Northeast Animal Shelter. "Brady is the sweetest couch potato, Lily is a grumpy old lady who only likes people when they have cheese, and Floyd is a crazy fetch-playing maniac. And I wouldn't change a thing." Rachael with Brady (left), Lily (middle), and Floyd (right) all adopted from the Northeast Animal Shelter. "Brady is the sweetest couch potato, Lily is a grumpy old lady, and Floyd is a cuddly fetch-playing maniac. I wouldn't change a thing about them."[/caption] [post_title] => The 6 Horrible Consequences of Adopting a Rescue Pet [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => the-6-horrible-consequences-of-adopting-a-rescue-pet [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-06-28 10:13:29 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-06-28 14:13:29 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?p=8731 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8708 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2017-06-16 14:57:33 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-06-16 18:57:33 [post_content] =>

IVG Rebrand - Phase II

New Logos and Hospital Materials are on the Horizon

  In December 2015, IVG Hospitals merged with three other specialty and emergency hospital groups across the country to form a new organization. We named ourselves Ethos Veterinary Health. Read more about the formation of Ethos here. In June 2016 we rolled out a new hospital logo with a “by Ethos” tagline (IVG logo by Ethos above) for each of our 14 Ethos hospitals. This was always anticipated as an interim step while we developed the Ethos Veterinary Health brand assets and aligned our disparate groups into one. Wheat Ridge Animal Hospital in Denver, CO kicked off the rebrand in March. IVG Hospitals is now starting phase II, and seeing the new materials start to become a reality is incredibly exciting.

What you will see:

Sneak Peak

Our materials will start to look a little different, but it is still the same team behind everything. You will start to see new colors, new imagery and a new logo. We hope that when you see the final products that it excites you as much as it does us! We are being environment and cost conscious as we roll out these new materials, so look for a slow rollout rather than a switch-flip. There will be several months where both logos are being used concurrently in our printed materials. We’d also love your help! Please share our rebrand on your social media today!

(Click image to enlarge) 

  social graphic_ethos rebrand-08    

Our Social Media Channels:

Instagram: @ethosvethealth Twitter: @ethosvethealth Facebook: [post_title] => New Logos are Coming [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => new-logos-are-coming [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-06-21 10:42:06 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-06-21 14:42:06 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?p=8708 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 10 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9422 [post_author] => 21 [post_date] => 2017-10-10 15:52:03 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-10-10 19:52:03 [post_content] => When the weekend rolls around, there’s nothing I want to do more than hang out with my dogs.  Though I am usually perfectly happy going for a hike or checking out a local pet-friendly dog boutique, the stakes change in October. In October I feel obligated by some tradition that is older than I am, to seek out pet friendly breweries and celebrate Oktoberfest with my favorite furry friend. (He’s more of a water-drinker, but I don’t judge).thumbnail_IMG_7748 On my hunt for a suitable locale, I turned up a few options and felt like it was only right to both evaluate their offerings, and share my findings with you. So here they are – six dog friendly breweries in theBoston area. We are in no way affiliated by any of these breweries. We just like dogs and beer, and think they are better together. Enjoy.

Lord Hobo

Woburn, MA At Lord Hobo dogs are welcome inside, you may also get to meet their brewery dog, Boss (sometimes he even shares his toys)! Lord Hobo Brewing Co. loves having dogs in their tap room and they are always welcome at their brewery events. Website: https://lordhobobrewing.com

Night Shift Brewing

Everett, MA At Night Shift Brewing dogs are welcome on their patio area. Their patio is spacious, and some tables are shaded for the warmer weather. You can grab some food from a local food truck and play some corn hole with your canine friend by your side. Tuesdays during the summer months they host Paws + Pints sponsored by local animal organizations. Website: https://www.nightshiftbrewing.com

Notch Brewing

Salem, MA At Notch Brewing dogs are welcome in the biergarten. They have a lovely outdoor space that overlooks the river, and on a good day, it’s a great place to sit and stay. Salem is such a fun place to walk around so after some brews, treat your pup to a nice walk through town! Website: http://www.notchbrewing.com

American Fresh Brewhouse (Slumbrew)

Somerville, MA (Assembly Row location) Dogs are welcome at the Somerville Brewing Company outdoor beergarden in Assembly Row. They have a small food menu, but the menu does include pretzels, and, assuming you brought a human companion, they provide board games to encourage you to hang out and enjoy the day. Website: http://www.slumbrew.com/Assembly_Row

603 Brewery

Londonderry, NH This brewery may be a little smaller compared to the others, but they still welcome dogs of all sizes with open arms! Whether you're stopping by to grab a flight or get growler or 6-pack for later, the staff members are always happy to see dogs. Keep your eyes peeled for their adorable brewery cat, Mitzi! Website: https://603brewery.com

Redhook Brewery

Portsmouth, NH Dogs are welcome to hang out on the patio at Red Hook. The patio is large, there are plenty of tables and shade for warmer days. They have a pretty solid bar menu and of course, brews on tap. Website: http://redhook.com/breweries-pubs/portsmouth   All of these establishments welcome well behaved, leashed, friendly dogs. Off-leash dogs are not welcome, no matter how small. Let’s all do our part to make sure more and more places open their hearths and patios to our beloved fuzzy co-pilots. If you have any interest in venturing out to one of these places be sure to check their social media platforms and do always call ahead to make sure their policies haven’t changed before venturing out.   [post_title] => Smile: There’s Beers and Dog Friendly Breweries [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => smile-theres-beers-and-dog-friendly-breweries [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-10-11 08:33:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-10-11 12:33:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ivghospitals.com/?p=9422 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 181 [max_num_pages] => 19 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => 1 [is_404] => [is_comments_popup] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash] => c705482ffbbc342a74d13ded980089e1 [query_vars_changed] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => )